Research Projects Directory

Research Projects Directory

1,014 active projects

This information was updated 1/22/2022

Information about each project within the Researcher Workbench is available in the Research Projects Directory below. Approved researchers provide their project’s research purpose, description, populations of interest, and more. This information helps All of Us ensure transparency on the type of research being conducted.

At this time, all listed projects are using data in the Registered Tier. The Registered Tier contains individual-level data from electronic health records, surveys, physical measurements, and wearables. Personal identifiers have been removed from these data to protect participant privacy.

Note: Researcher Workbench users provide information about their research projects independently. Views expressed in the Research Projects Directory belong to the relevant users and do not necessarily represent those of the All of Us Research Program. Information in the Research Projects Directory is also cross-posted on AllofUs.nih.gov in compliance with the 21st Century Cures Act.

testingFAIR

This is an educational Data Science and Engineering study of the ability to programmatically traverse WorkBench data sources and generate reusable summary statistics.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

This is an educational Data Science and Engineering study of the ability to programmatically traverse WorkBench data sources and generate reusable summary statistics.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Educational

Scientific Approaches

Identify descriptive summary statistics across multiple data types and then code them as part of reusable SDKs for educational use. The methodological starting pint is the real-time public summary statistics maintained by this observable notebook: https://observablehq.com/@episphere/aou

Anticipated Findings

This study seeks to assess the FAIRness of AllOfUs WorkBench by coding an educational Software Development Kit (SDK).

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Jonas Almeida - Senior Researcher, National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Duplicate of PGx anticancer drugs

The response to anticancer therapy is often characterized by wide inter-individual variation. My laboratory has a special interest in reducing this variation by individualizing treatment of cancer patients. Our focus is making sure that these drugs are administered at the…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

The response to anticancer therapy is often characterized by wide inter-individual variation. My laboratory has a special interest in reducing this variation by individualizing treatment of cancer patients. Our focus is making sure that these drugs are administered at the optimal dose to maximize drug efficacy and minimize toxicity. We hope to use the All of Us data to identify polymorphisms in drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters that affect the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of anticancer drugs (e.g., oral kinase inhibitors). Genetic association studies benefit from having a large sample size which we hope to find in the All of Us database. Any significant findings would provide us with valuable preliminary data to conduct clinical pharmacogenetic studies. Ultimately, clinically relevant gene-drug interactions could lead to the development of genotype-directed dosing strategies for anticancer drugs.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Drug Development

Scientific Approaches

We will conduct genetic association studies to identify significant gene-drug interactions. Clinical endpoints of interest include drug concentrations in plasma, drug-related toxicities, tumor response, progression-free survival, and overall survival.

Anticipated Findings

We expect that individuals carrying reduced-activity pharmacogenetic variants will have a greater risk for drug-related toxicities. Therefore, these individuals may benefit from genotype-directed dosing strategies instead of being treated at a fixed dose which is common for oral anticancer drugs.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Andrew Goey - Senior Researcher, Health Research, Inc. - Roswell Park Division

Hospital Readmission

I'm currently pursuing my MSHS in Biomedical Informatics at George Washington University and beginning investigation to see if there are any contributing features leading to hospital readmissions within the All of Us data set.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

I'm currently pursuing my MSHS in Biomedical Informatics at George Washington University and beginning investigation to see if there are any contributing features leading to hospital readmissions within the All of Us data set.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Hospital Readmission)

Scientific Approaches

Focus will be on patient history (ICD codes), procedures (CPT codes), care given, vitals, and other data available. Regressions and classification models will be initially used to investigate the data and any correlative relationships.

Anticipated Findings

Hopeful output will be to have a listing of the features in the All of Us dataset that has a relationship with a hospital readmission. Detailed review of the available data and cleaning will be necessary to produce any output.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Krystl Haerian - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, George Washington University

Lupus

I am interested in studying protein expression in immune cells isolated from patients with lupus as a mechanism to better understand immune cell dysregulation.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

I am interested in studying protein expression in immune cells isolated from patients with lupus as a mechanism to better understand immune cell dysregulation.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus)

Scientific Approaches

I will look at RNA Sequencing data of CD3+ positive T-Cells of common proteins found in the T-cell signalling pathway, looking for abnormal expression that would provide a hint to the immunopathology of lupus.

Anticipated Findings

If I can access individual level protein data, I will look for novel biomarkers in lupus T Cells that correlate with disease activity.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Research Team

Owner:

Coping strategies and psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic

This project aims to (1) identify the types of coping strategies used in response to COVID-19-related distress, (2) how the types of distress, and cumulative COVID-related distress load affect the choice of coping strategy, (3) identify sociodemographic factors that affect…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

This project aims to (1) identify the types of coping strategies used in response to COVID-19-related distress, (2) how the types of distress, and cumulative COVID-related distress load affect the choice of coping strategy, (3) identify sociodemographic factors that affect the type and severity of distress experienced, and (4) evaluate the effectiveness of the coping strategies on well-being, mood, anxiety, alcohol and substance use. We will also evaluate the specific impact of the pandemic on alcohol and substance use behavior. Understanding the relationship between distress and outcomes in the context of COVID-19 pandemic can help identify the most effective response to cope with pandemic-related distress. Additionally, knowing how the pandemic has impacted individuals from different sociodemographic groups, and identifying the coping behaviors these groups employ, can help us understand and reduce health disparities in the population.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

Coping behavior will first be classified into either adaptive or maladaptive. Dimension reduction techniques may be employed to further categorize and summarize coping strategies. We will also evaluate the rates of alcohol and substance use as a response to COVID-related distress. Relationships between types of distress, demographic and socioeconomic factors, and effectiveness of coping strategies will be evaluated using a structural equation modeling approach. Items from the COVID-19 Related Impact section of the COPE survey will be used to assess COVID-19-related distress. Types of distress may be classified into categories (psychological, social, financial etc.) to reduce the number of variables to be analyzed. Well-being, anxiety, depression, and loneliness will be used as outcomes to determine effectiveness of the coping strategies. Separate analyses will be conducted to specifically examine alcohol- and drug-related coping strategies as they relate to the outcomes of interest.

Anticipated Findings

We expect sociodemographic factors to be associated with the types and severity of distress, with individuals from socially disadvantaged groups experiencing greater distress. We expect a positive relationship between severity of distress and engagement of coping strategies. Finally, we expect adaptive coping strategies to be associated with positive outcomes, while maladaptive coping strategies to be associated with negative outcomes. Finally, we expect endorsement of alcohol use as a coping behavior to be associated with higher problematic alcohol use, as indicated by AUDIT-C scores. Understanding how the COVID-19 pandemic differentially affects individuals of different sociodemographic backgrounds provide important information to reduce COVID-19-related health disparities. Results from the study can also help individuals choose the most effective method to cope with COVID-19-related distress.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Tommy Gunawan - Research Fellow, National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Collaborators:

  • Jeremy Luk - Other, NIH

Duplicate of MS_new

NA

Scientific Questions Being Studied

NA

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

NA

Anticipated Findings

NA

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Xiaoqin Tang - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Henry Ford Health System

Cardiovascular Disease in MSM

This study will retrospectively analyze disparities in indicators of cardiovascular disease (i.e., hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemias, stroke, and inflammatory biomarkers) and risk and protective factors (i.e., smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, diet, access to healthcare, drug use,…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

This study will retrospectively analyze disparities in indicators of cardiovascular disease (i.e., hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidemias, stroke, and inflammatory biomarkers) and risk and protective factors (i.e., smoking, alcohol use, physical activity, diet, access to healthcare, drug use, intimate partner violence, sex work) among sexual minority individuals registered in the “All of Us” Database.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Educational

Scientific Approaches

We will identify prevalence rates of indicators of cardiovascular disease among the population of interest using frequencies. We will model outcomes using regression methods.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate that MSM will present with higher prevalence of cardiovascular outcomes, given the minority stress components.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Assad Khan - Graduate Trainee, University of Central Florida

Exploratory workspace to learn how to use All of Us data

The workspace is purely experimental to learn how to use the All of Us data in order to create trainings for the All of Us Evenings with Genetics program at Baylor College of Medicine

Scientific Questions Being Studied

The workspace is purely experimental to learn how to use the All of Us data in order to create trainings for the All of Us Evenings with Genetics program at Baylor College of Medicine

Project Purpose(s)

  • Educational

Scientific Approaches

Will retrieve data from multiple domains. Will use Python to statistically analyze and graph data

Anticipated Findings

This workspace is meant to be experimental to learn how to use the All of Us Workspace in order to create tutorials

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

MS_new

NA

Scientific Questions Being Studied

NA

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

NA

Anticipated Findings

NA

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Xiaoqin Tang - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Henry Ford Health System

Type 2 Diabetes Subtyping

The effects of different blood components on glucose levels in hyperglycemic patients. We want to create a predictive model which can estimate change in level of glucose by changing blood component concentration, such as RBC counts, electrolyte concentration, etc. ,…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

The effects of different blood components on glucose levels in hyperglycemic patients. We want to create a predictive model which can estimate change in level of glucose by changing blood component concentration, such as RBC counts, electrolyte concentration, etc. , in Type 2 diabetes patients.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (hyperglycemia)

Scientific Approaches

We will analyze the lab results of 150,000 plus individuals in the All Of Us Research workbench. We will try to find a pattern between glucose levels compared to blood components levels in normal and diabetic patients in Python and determine which blood component is associated with change in blood glucose levels. Once we determine these components, we want to create a predictive model which will determine which blood component can assist in blood glucose maintenance.

Anticipated Findings

The results of our study, once published, will assist doctors in making better decisions to regulate glucose levels with drugs, dietary, and lifestyle changes as well as if any medication changes levels of any blood components, our model can predict how it will affect glucose levels in the patients.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Jordan LaChance - Graduate Trainee, University of North Texas
  • Danyang Shao - Graduate Trainee, University of North Texas

Disparities in maternal mortality and morbidity in the USA

Maternal health is an important part of the health system of any country. Wit U.S, maternal mortality and morbidity is higher compared to any other developed country. According to PMSS report maternal death rate is 17.3 per 100,000 live birth.…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Maternal health is an important part of the health system of any country. Wit U.S, maternal mortality and morbidity is higher compared to any other developed country. According to PMSS report maternal death rate is 17.3 per 100,000 live birth. The World Health Organization (WHO) report says the position of the U.S in maternal mortality ranking is 56, which is unacceptable for a developed country. A clear picture of disparity is present in every report dealing this topic. The mortality rate among black American women is about 3 times higher than Non-Hispanic white women. The death rate among other minorities like Non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native, Asian-Pacific Islander is also higher. The case of maternal morbidity is also not different. The maternal death rate among Hispanic-Whites are lower, however Severe Maternal Morbidity (SMM) is higher among this minority group.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Educational

Scientific Approaches

With the time-stamped data for different procedures, laboratory results, and other hospital visits for the patient cohort, we aim to develop a process mining algorithm to identify variations in care pathways that cause adverse maternal outcomes. Process mining approaches in healthcare to identify variability in system level factors is a newer approach to conduct disparity research. Our research will address this gap in literature.
We hope to address the potential stigmatization issues by educating necessary stakeholders including hospital, providers, and policymakers. Once we have a preliminary framework, we hope to conduct a community based participatory research and engage with the community members. We propose that the process mining approach would help providers identify the “hotspots” in the care pathways that cause disparities.

Anticipated Findings

The major factors causing maternal mortality and morbidity are sociodemographic, socioeconomic, provider factors and system level factors. This research investigates the system level factors that can cause disparity in maternal health. With the AllofUs data we are trying to group the women utilized the healthcare system for their maternal care, with respect to their race/ethnicity, pregnancy complications, outcome etc. and find out the factors that caused adverse pregnancy outcome, mortality, and morbidity. Moreover, we apply novel process mining approaches to map the patient cohort and identify any changes in care pathways that may result in disparities.

The research will be helpful to find out the system-level factors other than income, insurance, or social status causing disparity in maternal health. Also, it can help in reducing those factors that have a major role in maternal health care disparities.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Geography
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level
  • Others

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Sreenath Chalil Madathil - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, University of Texas at El Paso
  • Anindita Nath - Graduate Trainee, University of Texas at El Paso
  • Myrtede Alfred - Other, Medical University of South Carolina
  • A. Logan - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Medical University of South Carolina

Self-reported knowledge of family health history

Disparities in access to genetics services are well-documented. There are many examples of when racial and ethnic minorities and individuals of lower socioeconomic status have been under counseled, under referred, and under tested for heritable diseases. In this workspace, we…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Disparities in access to genetics services are well-documented. There are many examples of when racial and ethnic minorities and individuals of lower socioeconomic status have been under counseled, under referred, and under tested for heritable diseases. In this workspace, we explore variation in levels of self-rated family health history knowledge as a possible driver of this disparity, given that family history is often used to determine which patients should screened for heritable disorders.

Research aims are:
1. Explore patterns of missingness in survey data to understand AoU survey respondents.
2. Describe and compare the characteristics of survey respondents with different levels of self-reported family health history knowledge, using the question "How much do you know about illnesses or health problems for your parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, and/or children?"
3. Identify significant predictors of reporting, 'A lot' vs. 'Some' vs. 'None' to the question above.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

Inclusion criteria:
- Adult All of Us survey participants
Exclusion criteria:
- None

Methods:
I will compare the characteristics of survey respondents who completed "The Basics" survey with those who completed other AoU surveys, those who consented to linkage of their EHR data, and those who completed other AoU Research Program activities.

I will then characterize study participants who completed the family health questionnaire. Those with different levels of self-rated family history knowledge will be compared by their sociodemographic characteristics, overall health, and access to healthcare using descriptive statistics and/or regression analyses. I will test the hypothesis that traditionally underrepresented groups in biomedical research (UBR) are less likely to report 'A lot' of knowledge about their family health history than non-UBR groups, as this could contribute to disparities in care.

Anticipated Findings

I anticipate that individuals who completed only The Basics survey will differ from the populations that have high survey completion, consent to EHR linkage, and participate in other aspects of the AoU Research Program.

Use of family history as a primary screening tool to determine who receives genetic testing may be inherently flawed if knowledge of one's family history of disease differs amongst different populations. This study will provide new insights into whether family history risks assessments may miss groups of individuals who might benefit from genetic testing because of poor family history knowledge.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

  • Leland Hull - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, The Broad Institute

Collaborators:

  • Romit Bhattacharya - Research Fellow, The Broad Institute
  • Mark Trinder - Graduate Trainee, The Broad Institute

HS & Biomarkers

We aim to determine whether inflammatory biomarkers are elevated among patients with HS and whether racial/ethnic differences exist.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We aim to determine whether inflammatory biomarkers are elevated among patients with HS and whether racial/ethnic differences exist.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (hidradenitis suppurativa)
  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

We plan to study inflammatory serum biomarkers and compare levels among HS patients to controls. Additionally, we will compare levels among different races/ethnicities with HS.

Anticipated Findings

We hypothesize patients with HS will have elevated levels of inflammatory biomarkers, which may suggest a role for systemic inflammation in comorbidities and disease severity associated with HS.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Research Team

Owner:

Endometriosis

Substance use and substance use disorders can lead to adverse health outcomes, including increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Endometriosis impacts 5-10% of the female population, and can result in chronic pain through pelvic pain and abdominal cramping. A delay…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Substance use and substance use disorders can lead to adverse health outcomes, including increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Endometriosis impacts 5-10% of the female population, and can result in chronic pain through pelvic pain and abdominal cramping. A delay of 4-10 years is incurred by women between onset of symptoms and formal diagnosis. Given that a formal diagnosis is required for appropriate treatment, this delay leads to a large gap between symptom development and treatment with subsequent pain management, which could lead to self-medication in an effort to manage ongoing pain symptoms. Within chronic pain patients in general, engaging in substance use, such as misuse of prescription medication, opioid misuse, and alcohol dependence and heavy drinking are reported as a means of self-medicating. Research is needed to examine whether chronic pain resulting from endometriosis increases risk for substance use and substance use disorder among women with endometriosis.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (endometriosis)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

The proposed study will be accomplished through using the NIH All of Us database. Eligible individuals will be females ages 18-50. Endometriosis will be operationalized through both self-report from survey data and/or electronic health records (EHR). The comparison group will consist of women without endometriosis, matched by age. EHR will be used to determine alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder and opioid use disorder. Past-year alcohol use, and past-three-month cannabis and opioid use will be determined through questionnaire data. Social support will be ascertained through a social support scale constructed from survey questions assessing access to past-month emotional support. Sensitivity analyses will be carried out comparing women receiving treatment for endometriosis to those without and excluding women with other chronic pain, to explore the effectiveness of current pain management strategies on substance use and SUD.

Anticipated Findings

This study anticipates finding substance use (alcohol use, heavy drinking, binge drinking, cannabis use, and opioid use) and substance use disorders (alcohol use disorder, cannabis use disorder, and opioid use disorder) to be elevated among women with endometriosis as a result of chronic pain. This study will guide future public health interventions by exploring causes of chronic pain which could be driving increases in problematic drinking among women and other substance use outcomes. A greater understanding of chronic pain and etiologies of pain among women will provide necessary evidence to guide clinical interventions and appropriate pain management. Further, women with endometriosis experience chronic pain, which may be impacting access to and perceived social support. Investigating the role of social support on the relationship between chronic pain and substance use will allow for improved clinical guidance regarding psychosocial factors.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

PWH and Multimorbidity

We are exploring the data to formalize a specific research question. Broadly, we are interested in multimorbidity patterns in people with HIV (PWH). What are the multimorbidity patterns across sub-groups of PWH, including lifestyle-related comorbidities like substance use (alcohol, recreational…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We are exploring the data to formalize a specific research question. Broadly, we are interested in multimorbidity patterns in people with HIV (PWH). What are the multimorbidity patterns across sub-groups of PWH, including lifestyle-related comorbidities like substance use (alcohol, recreational drugs, tobacco, etc.)? What are the behavioral health needs of PWH and multimorbidity? This is relevant to science or public health due to longer survival rates of treated PWH and the potential impact of multimorbidity on quality of life. As the number of HIV care specialists decreases, there is a growing demand for primary care physicians to treat patients with HIV. The majority of patients with HIV and non-HIV comorbidities in need of behavioral health care are seen in primary care, but challenges persist. While some primary care practices provide integrated behavioral health care, many other settings may not due to difficulties with obtaining high levels of integration.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (HIV and Multimorbidity)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Educational

Scientific Approaches

We will begin with a systematic review of the literature, which will then guide the exploratory analysis of data. We will analyze data from a cohort of PWH who also have one or more additional chronic conditions, each one of which is either a physical non-communicable disease, a mental health condition, or an infectious disease.

Anticipated Findings

An increased understanding of multimorbidity patterns and behavioral health needs in PWH. Primary care settings likely continue to experience challenges and barriers to identifying behavioral health needs and treating or referring those patients for behavioral health services. Findings can help guide decisions about treatment and uncover unique treatment needs based on various psychosocial factors.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation

Research Team

Owner:

  • Josh Matacotta - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Western University of Health Sciences

Migraines and Bipolar Disorder

The goal for this project is to identify the occurrence of migraines with bipolar disorder with and without medication management.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

The goal for this project is to identify the occurrence of migraines with bipolar disorder with and without medication management.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Educational

Scientific Approaches

The data will be filtered by bipolar disorder diagnosis and migraine diagnosis. Survey questions about medication management will then be incorporated. All of Us tools will be used to import and evaluate data.

Anticipated Findings

This research will be used primarily for the graduate studies of a biomedical informatics student. If any significant discoveries arise, the student will attempt to alert subject matter experts of the findings. The link between migraines and bipolar disorder is anticipated to be found in this evaluation. The inclusion of medication data may identify additional inquiries.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Disability Status

Research Team

Owner:

  • Erin Bond - Graduate Trainee, George Washington University

COVID-19 Project

This study will examine disparities in the impact of COVID-19 and related outcomes in terms of age, gender, race/ethnicity and other characteristics among diverse adults in the United States.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

This study will examine disparities in the impact of COVID-19 and related outcomes in terms of age, gender, race/ethnicity and other characteristics among diverse adults in the United States.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

This study will utilize data from the COVID-19 Participant Experience (COPE) survey, as well as data from the basics, lifestyle, overall health, personal medical history and health care access utilization surveys.

Anticipated Findings

It is expected that there will be disparities in the impact of COVID-19 consistent with many other documented disparities in the U.S.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Felicia Wheaton - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Xavier University of Louisiana

Collaborators:

  • Farhana Islam - Undergraduate Student, Xavier University of Louisiana

Diabetes-CKD-LimbLoss

We intend to explore the questions: To what extent does Chronic Kidney Disease contribute to lower limb amputations in diabetes patients? and Are their differences among black patients compared to other race groups? (Differences may include time to diagnosis, mortality,…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We intend to explore the questions: To what extent does Chronic Kidney Disease contribute to lower limb amputations in diabetes patients? and Are their differences among black patients compared to other race groups? (Differences may include time to diagnosis, mortality, decisions to amputate, e.g.)

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Educational

Scientific Approaches

For this phase of our study we will use a secondary data analytical approach, primarily building a study cohort using the All of Us workbench. We will abstract cases for all patients with diabetes, all cases of chronic kidney disease, and all cases of lower limb loss. We will exclude cases for patients <25 years old.
All diagnosed cases are identified with ICD 10 codes.
Diabetes - E11 Defined using American Diabetes Association definitions.
Chronic Kidney Disease - N18-N18.9, Defined based on the National Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines.
Lower Limb Amputations - G57.8
Demographics including: race, age, SES (or related variable), amputation level, sex, marital status, cardiovascular co-morbid conditions

Descriptive statistics and Chi square are planned to compare proportion of amputations based on CKD alone, CKD+Diabetes, and CKD+ Diabetes + other co-morbid condition.

Anticipated Findings

We Hypothesize that a higher rate of amputation will occur with co-occurring diabetes and CKD than with diabetes alone.
We also Hypothesize that diagnoses for Diabetes and co-occurring CKD for black patients will occur at more advance stages than the diagnoses for white patients.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age

Research Team

Owner:

participation_analysis

In this analysis, we aim to compare the characteristics of allofUS participants vs. the general population. This will inform if the allofUS participants are representative of the general population and if different participation characteristics vary across ancestry groups. This is…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

In this analysis, we aim to compare the characteristics of allofUS participants vs. the general population. This will inform if the allofUS participants are representative of the general population and if different participation characteristics vary across ancestry groups. This is important because to generalize the results observed in allofUS to the entire US population we need to understand how representative is this study.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Methods Development

Scientific Approaches

We will select specific socio-demographic variables that are available in allofUS and in the US census: education level, health and labour market. We will then compare the distribution of the individuals within each category in allofUS and in the US census. We will run these analyses separately for each ethnicity.

Anticipated Findings

We will provide a better understanding of how representative is allofUS compared to the general US population. This might information can be used to "re-weight" analysis obtained from allofUS to be representative of the general US population.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • andrea ganna - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, The Broad Institute

liver_disease_ bisphosphonate

Our preclinical study suggested that gamma delta T cell enrichment might be associated with liver disease progression. It is known bisphosphonate drugs like Pamidronate and Zoledronate could activate gamma delta T cells. This project aims to investigate whether bisphosphonate drugs…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Our preclinical study suggested that gamma delta T cell enrichment might be associated with liver disease progression. It is known bisphosphonate drugs like Pamidronate and Zoledronate could activate gamma delta T cells. This project aims to investigate whether bisphosphonate drugs could induce liver disease progression.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (liver disease)
  • Drug Development

Scientific Approaches

We will search the count of liver disease patients who took bisphosphonate drugs and compare with randomly selected patients who took bisphosphonate drugs. We also will assess the risk of developing liver diseases by comparing patients before or after taking bisphosphonate drugs.

Anticipated Findings

The hypothesis is based on our preclinical study. If we could find evidence using clinical data, it could further support our finding and likely reduce the use of bisphosphonate drugs in liver disease patients.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Bin Chen - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Michigan State University

COPE Data

Occupational

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Occupational

Project Purpose(s)

  • Other Purpose (Occupational)

Scientific Approaches

Occupational

Anticipated Findings

Occupational

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • David Bates - Project Personnel, All of Us Program Operational Use

pharmacology

We are interested in understanding differentiated effects of drug across subpopulations. In particular, we are looking at associations in males vs females, European descendants vs non-European descendants, older patients vs younger. We hope to generate evidence for differentiated effects across…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We are interested in understanding differentiated effects of drug across subpopulations. In particular, we are looking at associations in males vs females, European descendants vs non-European descendants, older patients vs younger. We hope to generate evidence for differentiated effects across subpopulations by using AoU data.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Drug Development
  • Methods Development

Scientific Approaches

Data on drug use documented in the EHRs and survey datasets. Logistic regression and survival models will be used to evaluate the associations of drug use with outcomes in the AoU data. We are interested in all categories of drugs with sufficient records in AoU.

Anticipated Findings

We hope to identify subpopulations which had different outcomes in certain drug use, which could inform both clinical practice and public health policy.. We also hope to integrate genetic information and uncover the underlying mechanism for the differentiated effects in the future.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Sex at Birth

Research Team

Owner:

  • Chenjie Zeng - Research Fellow, National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Discrimination, Social Isolation, and Support during the COIVD-19 Pandemic

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences were for different groups of people. In addition, it is unknown how these experiences increased or decreased during high points in the pandemic. Lastly, it is unclear how social isolation and the disruption in human connection (e.g. with family, friends, etc.) may have been associated with the mental health effects of discrimination during the pandemic. This is of considerable public health significance because we must not only address the mental health needs of those in need, but understand the specific correlates of mental health, such as discrimination, to prevent such an uptick in mental health distress due to discrimination during the next pandemic.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I plan on using the COPE data source from May 2020-February 2021 to examine changes in experiences of discrimination, social isolation, human connection, and mental health. I will utilize hierarchical linear models to asses random and fixed effects, as well as potential mediators and moderators. The COPE has questions related to discrimination experiences in each wave, family connections, social isolation, and mental health. I will also utilize the main survey to access basic sociodemographic information (e.g. race/ethnicity, age, socio economic status, etc.) to utilize as covariates in my analyses.

Anticipated Findings

Based on the extant research literature, I believe that we will find that there is a general uptick in perceived discrimination during COVID. In addition, we hypothesize that as discrimination experiences increase, so does poor mental health. We also hypothesize that social isolation will mediate the longitudinal relationship between perceived discrimination and perceive social isolation and perceived mental health. Lastly, we hypothesize a mediated-moderated model whereby those with perceived positive human connections who experience greater discrimination will report less social isolation and thus less poor mental health compared to those with perceived negative human connections who experience greater discrimination.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Catherine Xin - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Allen Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Cannabis and Health Outcomes

There has been a growing interest in understanding the effects of cannabinoid receptor agonism on health . Large cohort have provided mixed results, with both benefits and risks associated with cannabis use. However, these studies have methodological flaws and affect…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

There has been a growing interest in understanding the effects of cannabinoid receptor agonism on health . Large cohort have provided mixed results, with both benefits and risks associated with cannabis use. However, these studies have methodological flaws and affect their validity. Moreover, past studies have largely focused on self reported lifetime cannabis. This is a problematic exposure related to several social factors and subject to stigmatization. Finally, most studies do not consider the frequency of use or dose-response relationships. Utilization of the All of Us data will enable a more nuanced discussion around the relationships between cannabis use and health outcomes and avoid stigmatization present in current medical literature.

Our study aims to avoid the stigmatization inherent to past work. We aim to include measures of frequency of use, that is a more precise exposure than lifetime cannabis use that groups habitual and infrequent users together.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (cardiometabolic diesase, kidney disease)
  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

Our research group aims to perform
1. Association analyses (logistic regression) of cannabis use frequency with cardiometabolic health (coronary artery disease, arrhythmias, heart failure) and renal disease. We will use the detailed surveys from All of Us that include questions on the frequency of marijuana use in the past three months as well as DSM-5 diagnoses present in the electronic health record (ex. cannabis use disorder).
2. We will then extend this analysis by performing a two-sample Mendelian Randomization studies using publicly available genome-wide association study (GWAS) summary statistics. The goal is to build upon the approach adopted by past work in exploring the genetic liability of cannabis use disorder and psychiatric comorbidities.

Anticipated Findings

We expect to replicate known associations of cannabis use (ex cannabis use and acute myocardial infarction). This work will contribute to the body of evidence for the health benefits and risks of cannabis use. Given the comprehensive survey data in All of Us, we also expect to find new associations of cannabis use frequency and disease risk.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Ishan Paranjpe - Graduate Trainee, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Collaborators:

  • Iain Forrest - Graduate Trainee, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

GCM2

Determine the potential role of GCM2 variants in promoting parathyroid tumorigenesis and overall penetrance.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Determine the potential role of GCM2 variants in promoting parathyroid tumorigenesis and overall penetrance.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Ancestry

Scientific Approaches

Evaluate both patients with parathyroid tumors and the general population for prevalance of GCM2 variants.

Anticipated Findings

GCM2 variants may be associated with a more severe clinical phenotype. May affect treatment decisions and genetic testing of individuals with primary hyperparathyroidism and their family members.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

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