Jingjing Yu

Research Fellow, University of California, Irvine

4 active projects

Prevalence of Germline Mutations for Cancer

Certain germline mutations with known predisposition for cancer are more commonly found in certain races/ethnicities (ie: CHD1 mutation in Hispanic patients with gastric cancer). These patients can have earlier and more aggressive disease. However, we do not know the overall…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Certain germline mutations with known predisposition for cancer are more commonly found in certain races/ethnicities (ie: CHD1 mutation in Hispanic patients with gastric cancer). These patients can have earlier and more aggressive disease. However, we do not know the overall prevalence of these germline mutations among different racial/ethnic groups, including those that are healthy. Using the All of Us genomic data, we aim to investigate the overall prevalence of various germline mutations and determine differences that may exist between different racial/ethnic groups to identify high risk populations.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Ancestry

Scientific Approaches

To answer our question, we will query the genomic data from the controlled tier database. We will determine the prevalence of different germline mutations with known predisposition for various cancers among all participants in different race/ethnicity groups. We will also compare prevalences for these germline mutations between participants of different races/ethnicities, and between healthy participants to patients with cancer.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate different germline mutations may be more prevalent in certain groups of people based on race/ethnicity. With this information, we can focus screening efforts on higher risk patients to improve prevention and treatment of cancers.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Jingjing Yu - Research Fellow, University of California, Irvine

Collaborators:

  • Kurt Yamamoto - Project Personnel, University of California, Irvine

Cancer in US born vs Foreign Born Hispanic Participants v4

Our aim is to study the effects of birthplace and acculturation on the prevalence and risk of infection related cancers in the Hispanic population. This is important because high risk populations need to be identified to focus screening efforts.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Our aim is to study the effects of birthplace and acculturation on the prevalence and risk of infection related cancers in the Hispanic population. This is important because high risk populations need to be identified to focus screening efforts.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Gastric Cancer)

Scientific Approaches

We will compare US born and non-US born hispanics with gastric, cervical and liver cancers by gathering demographic and health data. We will perform multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess risk of infection related cancers between these two groups.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipant finding a difference in the prevalence and risk of infection-related cancers among US born and non-US born Hispanic participants.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Jingjing Yu - Research Fellow, University of California, Irvine
  • Amber Gonda - Project Personnel, University of California, Irvine

Genetic and Epigenetic Changes for HCG Cancers Among Hispanic Participants

Hispanic individuals have a higher incidence of stomach, cervix and liver cancers compared to non-Hispanic White (NHW) individuals. Multiple factors can be contributing to this disparity including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural and biological. In work previously done by our group using…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Hispanic individuals have a higher incidence of stomach, cervix and liver cancers compared to non-Hispanic White (NHW) individuals. Multiple factors can be contributing to this disparity including socioeconomic, environmental, cultural and biological. In work previously done by our group using the All of Us database, we found non-US born Hispanic participants had higher prevalence for stomach, cervix and liver cancers compared to US born Hispanic participants. However, US born Hispanic participants had higher rates of smoking, alcohol and obesity compared to non-US born Hispanic participants, which are known risk factors for these cancers. Therefore, we hypothesize genetic predisposition and epigenetic modifications are also contributing factors to the prevalence and risk of stomach, cervix and liver cancers. We aim to identify genetic and epigenetic differences between US born and non-US born Hispanic patients with these three cancers using the All of Us genomics data.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Primary stomach, cervix and liver cancer )
  • Ancestry

Scientific Approaches

We will use the genomics data available in the controlled tier dataset v5 to identify genetic variants and epigenetic changes among Hispanic patients with stomach, cervix or liver cancers who born outside of the US compared to those born inside the US. We will also compare Hispanic patients to patients of other races/ethnicities (Non-Hispanic White, Asian, Black/African American) and to healthy participants.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate finding genetic variants and epigenetic differences between Hispanic patients with stomach, cervix or liver cancers who were born outside of the US compared to those born inside the US. These genetic variants and epigenetic differences can potentially be used to create biomarkers for these cancers that can be used for screening, diagnosis and/or treatment monitoring.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Jingjing Yu - Research Fellow, University of California, Irvine
  • Amber Gonda - Project Personnel, University of California, Irvine

Cancer in US born vs Foreign Born Hispanic Participants v5

Our aim is to study the effects of birthplace and acculturation on the prevalence and risk of infection related cancers in the Hispanic population. This is important because high risk populations need to be identified to focus screening efforts.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Our aim is to study the effects of birthplace and acculturation on the prevalence and risk of infection related cancers in the Hispanic population. This is important because high risk populations need to be identified to focus screening efforts.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Gastric Cancer)

Scientific Approaches

We will compare US born and non-US born hispanics with gastric, cervical and liver cancers by gathering demographic and health data. We will perform multivariate logistic regression analysis to assess risk of infection related cancers between these two groups.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipant finding a difference in the prevalence and risk of infection-related cancers among US born and non-US born Hispanic participants.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Jingjing Yu - Research Fellow, University of California, Irvine
  • Amber Gonda - Project Personnel, University of California, Irvine

Collaborators:

  • Farideh Dehkordi-Vakil - Other, University of California, Irvine
  • Maheswari Senthil - Mid-career Tenured Researcher, University of California, Irvine
  • Aditi Deepak - Project Personnel, All of Us Program Operational Use
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