Leland Hull

Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, The Broad Institute

5 active projects

Duplicate of Phenotype Creation

We seek to understand the association between carriers of autosomal recessive disease and distinct clinical phenotypes. This workspace will be used for development of clinical phenotypes representing the spectrum of adult diseases, as well as association studies to assess whether…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We seek to understand the association between carriers of autosomal recessive disease and distinct clinical phenotypes. This workspace will be used for development of clinical phenotypes representing the spectrum of adult diseases, as well as association studies to assess whether carrier status for different autosomal recessive disorders is associated with increased or decreased disease risk. Modifiers of risk will also be assessed.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Methods Development
  • Ancestry

Scientific Approaches

Descriptive analyses of clinical phenotypes will be performed, using a combination of self-reported, physical measurement, biospecimen, and electronic health record data. Additional data types may be added as they are released in All of Us. Tests of association will be used to assess the relationship(s) between carrier status and clinical phenotypes.

Anticipated Findings

This research will help to bring clarity to an area of uncertainty around whether carriers of autosomal recessive disease may manifest symptoms of disease, which could help inform counseling about genetic testing for these diseases. If risk was modifiable, it could inform care recommendations.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Leland Hull - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, The Broad Institute

Collaborators:

  • Bianca Porneala - Project Personnel, Mass General Brigham

COPE-SURVEY ANALYSES

We intend to try to understand the impact of COVID-19 on participant stressors, and how having a usual source of healthcare affected COVID-19 related health behaviors and stressors.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We intend to try to understand the impact of COVID-19 on participant stressors, and how having a usual source of healthcare affected COVID-19 related health behaviors and stressors.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We intend to use survey data, physical measurement data, EHR data, to perform association studies to assess the impact of having a usual source of healthcare on COVID-19 related behaviors and stressors.

Anticipated Findings

We seek to understand whether having a usual source of care is protective against stressors, or promotes healthy behaviors.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

  • Leland Hull - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, The Broad Institute
  • Leland Hull - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Mass General Brigham
  • Bianca Porneala - Project Personnel, Mass General Brigham

Duplicate of Self-reported knowledge of family health history

Family history is used as a screening tool to refer patients for predictive and diagnostic genetic testing; reimbursement of said testing is often also based upon a family history of disease. Therefore, individuals who are less knowledgeable about their family…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Family history is used as a screening tool to refer patients for predictive and diagnostic genetic testing; reimbursement of said testing is often also based upon a family history of disease. Therefore, individuals who are less knowledgeable about their family history of disease are less likely to qualify for genetic counseling and/or testing.

I will seek to fulfill the following research aims:
1. Explore patterns of missingness in survey data in order to better understand populations that may or may not be represented among AoU survey respondents.
2. Characterize survey respondents with different levels of self-reported knowledge of a family history of disease, as indicated by the survey question "How much do you know about illnesses or health problems for your parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, and/or children?"
3. Test whether self-reported family history of disease knowledge is associated with uptake of preventive screenings and/or genetic counseling.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

Inclusion criteria:
- Adult All of Us survey participants
Exclusion criteria:
- None

Methods:
I will compare the characteristics of survey respondents who completed "The Basics" survey with those who completed other AoU surveys, those who consented to linkage of their EHR data, and those who completed other AoU Research Program activities.

I will then characterize study participants who completed the family health questionnaire. Survey and EHR data will be linked. Those with different levels of self-rated family history knowledge will be compared by their sociodemographic characteristics, overall health, and access to healthcare using descriptive statistics and/or regression analyses. I will focus on testing the hypothesis that traditionally underrepresented groups in biomedical research (UBR) are less likely to report about their family health history than non-UBR groups.

Anticipated Findings

I anticipate that individuals who completed only The Basics survey will differ from the populations that have high survey completion, consent to EHR linkage, and participate in other aspects of the AoU Research Program.

Use of family history as a primary screening tool to determine who receives genetic testing may be inherently flawed if knowledge of one's family history of disease differs amongst different populations. This study will provide new insights into whether family history risks assessments may miss groups of individuals who might benefit from genetic testing because of poor family history knowledge.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

  • Leland Hull - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, The Broad Institute

Collaborators:

  • Romit Bhattacharya - Research Fellow, The Broad Institute
  • Mark Trinder - Graduate Trainee, The Broad Institute

Self-reported knowledge of family health history

Family history is used as a screening tool to refer patients for predictive and diagnostic genetic testing; reimbursement of said testing is often also based upon a family history of disease. Therefore, individuals who are less knowledgeable about their family…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Family history is used as a screening tool to refer patients for predictive and diagnostic genetic testing; reimbursement of said testing is often also based upon a family history of disease. Therefore, individuals who are less knowledgeable about their family history of disease are less likely to qualify for genetic counseling and/or testing.

I will seek to fulfill the following research aims:
1. Explore patterns of missingness in survey data in order to better understand populations that may or may not be represented among AoU survey respondents.
2. Characterize survey respondents with different levels of self-reported knowledge of a family history of disease, as indicated by the survey question "How much do you know about illnesses or health problems for your parents, grandparents, brothers, sisters, and/or children?"
3. Test whether self-reported family history of disease knowledge is associated with uptake of preventive screenings and/or genetic counseling.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

Inclusion criteria:
- Adult All of Us survey participants
Exclusion criteria:
- None

Methods:
I will compare the characteristics of survey respondents who completed "The Basics" survey with those who completed other AoU surveys, those who consented to linkage of their EHR data, and those who completed other AoU Research Program activities.

I will then characterize study participants who completed the family health questionnaire. Survey and EHR data will be linked. Those with different levels of self-rated family history knowledge will be compared by their sociodemographic characteristics, overall health, and access to healthcare using descriptive statistics and/or regression analyses. I will focus on testing the hypothesis that traditionally underrepresented groups in biomedical research (UBR) are less likely to report about their family health history than non-UBR groups.

Anticipated Findings

I anticipate that individuals who completed only The Basics survey will differ from the populations that have high survey completion, consent to EHR linkage, and participate in other aspects of the AoU Research Program.

Use of family history as a primary screening tool to determine who receives genetic testing may be inherently flawed if knowledge of one's family history of disease differs amongst different populations. This study will provide new insights into whether family history risks assessments may miss groups of individuals who might benefit from genetic testing because of poor family history knowledge.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

  • Leland Hull - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, The Broad Institute

Collaborators:

  • Romit Bhattacharya - Research Fellow, The Broad Institute
  • Mark Trinder - Graduate Trainee, The Broad Institute
  • Bianca Porneala - Project Personnel, Mass General Brigham

Missing Data

We will explore missingness in AoU data that could be used in the development of clinical phenotypes by participant demographics. We seek to explore and better understand longitudinal engagement of participants who are supplying information to the AoU RP in…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We will explore missingness in AoU data that could be used in the development of clinical phenotypes by participant demographics. We seek to explore and better understand longitudinal engagement of participants who are supplying information to the AoU RP in order to understand the strengths and benefits of the dataset when using for phenotype correlations.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Methods Development

Scientific Approaches

Systematically explore missingness in the participant surveys, access to EHR data, and participant measurements. We will start with descriptive analysis of missingness for UBR populations compared to non-UBR populations. Further analyses will be updated based on initial exploratory findings.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipated that engagement may fall off after enrollment; if so, we hope to determine areas for intervention that could encourage longitudinal engagement in AoU for participants.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

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