Maheswari Senthil

Mid-career Tenured Researcher, University of California, Irvine

3 active projects

Duplicate of Hispanic cancer

Despite lower incidence rates of more common cancers, such as breast, colon, lung, and prostate, Hispanics have a disproportionately higher incidence and mortality for cancers associated with infectious agents such as liver, cervical, and gastric cancer (GC). For example, GC…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Despite lower incidence rates of more common cancers, such as breast, colon, lung, and prostate, Hispanics have a disproportionately higher incidence and mortality for cancers associated with infectious agents such as liver, cervical, and gastric cancer (GC). For example, GC incidence is 1.6 times higher in Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) with a nearly two-fold increase in mortality. The increase in mortality in Hispanics is often attributed to poor socioeconomic status and the resultant delayed presentation to health care systems.
To study the variation in the incidence of all cancers in Hispanics based on immigration status.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (cancer)
  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

Specific Aim 1: To assess the effect of acculturation on the incidence of Hispanic cancer
Research Plan:
.All of Us research program will be queried to identify participants with gastric cancer. The incidence of gastric cancer among immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics will be assessed and compared with the non-Hispanic control group. Age, sex, country of birth, immigration status, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol), and comorbidities will be used in a multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify factors that are associated with gastric cancer in Hispanics. The impact of acculturation on variations in projected incidence will be calculated as described previously.

Specific Aim 2: To assess the incidence of cancer in Hispanic/ Latino ethnic subgroups

Anticipated Findings

We believe the incidence of cancers, particularly for gastric, cervical and liver cancers will be different based on the country of origin and immigration status.
Although, there is significant evidence about increased incidence and mortality of gastric cancer in Hispanics, there is very little to no evidence on the impact of acculturation on cancer incidence. The proposed study will help identify the impact of acculturation on cancer incidence. Additionally, the variations in the incidence of cancer among different Hispanic race/ethnic subgroups residing in United states combined with genomic data will give us an idea about the high-risk groups and the genomic variations that account for variations in incidence. Such comprehensive analysis combining population data with genomic data is currently not available for cancer in Hispanics. Data form this analysis will add new information that could be utilized to improve cancer outcomes in this race/ethnic subgroup.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Research Team

Owner:

  • Maheswari Senthil - Mid-career Tenured Researcher, University of California, Irvine

Collaborators:

  • Farideh Dehkordi-Vakil - Other, University of California, Irvine

Hispanic cancer

Despite lower incidence rates of more common cancers, such as breast, colon, lung, and prostate, Hispanics have a disproportionately higher incidence and mortality for cancers associated with infectious agents such as liver, cervical, and gastric cancer (GC). For example, GC…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Despite lower incidence rates of more common cancers, such as breast, colon, lung, and prostate, Hispanics have a disproportionately higher incidence and mortality for cancers associated with infectious agents such as liver, cervical, and gastric cancer (GC). For example, GC incidence is 1.6 times higher in Hispanics compared to non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) with a nearly two-fold increase in mortality. The increase in mortality in Hispanics is often attributed to poor socioeconomic status and the resultant delayed presentation to health care systems.
To study the variation in the incidence of all cancers in Hispanics based on immigration status.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (cancer)
  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

Specific Aim 1: To assess the effect of acculturation on the incidence of Hispanic cancer
Research Plan:
.All of Us research program will be queried to identify participants with gastric cancer. The incidence of gastric cancer among immigrant and non-immigrant Hispanics will be assessed and compared with the non-Hispanic control group. Age, sex, country of birth, immigration status, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol), and comorbidities will be used in a multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify factors that are associated with gastric cancer in Hispanics. The impact of acculturation on variations in projected incidence will be calculated as described previously.

Specific Aim 2: To assess the incidence of cancer in Hispanic/ Latino ethnic subgroups

Anticipated Findings

We believe the incidence of cancers, particularly for gastric, cervical and liver cancers will be different based on the country of origin and immigration status.
Although, there is significant evidence about increased incidence and mortality of gastric cancer in Hispanics, there is very little to no evidence on the impact of acculturation on cancer incidence. The proposed study will help identify the impact of acculturation on cancer incidence. Additionally, the variations in the incidence of cancer among different Hispanic race/ethnic subgroups residing in United states combined with genomic data will give us an idea about the high-risk groups and the genomic variations that account for variations in incidence. Such comprehensive analysis combining population data with genomic data is currently not available for cancer in Hispanics. Data form this analysis will add new information that could be utilized to improve cancer outcomes in this race/ethnic subgroup.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Research Team

Owner:

  • Maheswari Senthil - Mid-career Tenured Researcher, University of California, Irvine

Hispanic gastric cancer

Gastric cancer is one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal malignancies with a precipitous decrease in survival with increasing stages. Disturbing trends with increased incidence of gastric cancer in younger men and presentation at later stages are observed in Hispanics. Understanding…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Gastric cancer is one of the most aggressive gastrointestinal malignancies with a precipitous decrease in survival with increasing stages. Disturbing trends with increased incidence of gastric cancer in younger men and presentation at later stages are observed in Hispanics. Understanding the pathogenic drivers (environmental, lifestyle, and biologic) for the aggressive and later stage presentations is crucial to make an impact in the outcomes of gastric cancer in Hispanics. The proposed study will help identify the impact of acculturation and ethnic origin on gastric cancer incidence. Furthermore, genomic alterations that predispose to gastric cancer will provided deeper understanding about the biology of gastric cancer in Hispanics and may help identify treatment targets.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Gastric cancer)
  • Population Health
  • Ancestry

Scientific Approaches

All Hispanic participants from All of us research program will be queried to identify participants with gastric cancer. Age, sex, country of birth, immigration status, socioeconomic status, lifestyle factors ( smoking, alcohol), and comorbidities will be used in a multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify factors predictive of gastric cancer incidence in Hispanics.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate that this analysis will give us information about the effects of acculturation on the incidence of gastric cancer. Additionally, the variations in the incidence of gastric cancer among different Hispanic race/ethnic subgroups residing in United states will give us an idea about the high-risk groups among Hispanics. Identification of high-risk factors will help develop criteria for screening to detect premalignant conditions and cancer at earlier stages. Due to the overall low incidence of gastric cancer in the United States, screening programs for gastric cancer will only be useful in specific high-risk groups. Knowledge about the high-risk group among Hispanics is currently lacking. Results from this study will add to the body of literature and help inform screening strategies to improve gastric cancer outcomes in Hispanics.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Research Team

Owner:

  • Maheswari Senthil - Mid-career Tenured Researcher, University of California, Irvine
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