Stephanie Cook

Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University

14 active projects

Housing Insecurity and Mental Wellbeing v6 CT

This exploratory analysis will examine the association between housing insecurity and the impact of COVID-19 on participant health and mental health as measured in the COPE surveys. The initial exploration will assess whether the sample sizes and cross-tabulations are sufficient…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

This exploratory analysis will examine the association between housing insecurity and the impact of COVID-19 on participant health and mental health as measured in the COPE surveys. The initial exploration will assess whether the sample sizes and cross-tabulations are sufficient to proceed with a research project examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on housing insecure individuals, as compared to securely-housed individuals.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

This analysis will pull data from the Basics survey and the COPE surveys to examine whether answers in the COPE surveys can be broken down by differential housing circumstances. This will include summary and bivariate analyses.

Anticipated Findings

We hypothesize that housing insecurity will be associated with enduring worse health and mental health outcomes as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
This research project seeks to reduce health disparities and improve health equity in underrepresented in biomedical research (UBR) populations.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Giselle Routhier - Research Fellow, New York University, Grossman School of Medicine
  • Binyu Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Trajectories of Cardiovascular Risk Among Sexual and Gender Minorities v2

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention interventions to be optimally impactful. Further, it is important to understand the factors that may mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. In this analysis we will examine trajectories of cardiovascular risk in the All of Us longitudinal research cohort. In addition, we will examine differences in the trajectories by race, gender, sexual orientation and their intersection on trajectories of cardiovascular risk. Further, we will examine if features of social life like social support and residence mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. We anticipate clarifying how cardiovascular risk changes over time between multiple different ethic/racial, sexual orientation and gender groups.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We will utilize the survey and biological datasets for this analysis, including the social determinants of health data. We will operationalize cardiovascular risk using a composite of cardiovascular risk factors including c-reactive protein, body mass index, etc. In addition, we will stratify our sample by biological sex due to the ways in which cardiovascular risk operate differentially between biological women and men. We will utilize generalized linear modeling to test our study hypothesis. Further, we will utilize the survey data in All of Us to determine how place of residence (e.g. urban vs. rural) and social support from friends or family may operate to lower cardiovascular risk overtime.

Anticipated Findings

This study will characterize how cardiovascular risk functions over time among sexual and gender minorities and specifically among sexual and gender minorities of color. This will allow us to more precisely establish when prevention interventions may be most effectively across time. In addition, examining potential "buffers" will allow us to explore new avenues where we may be able to create effective prevention interventions to protect SGM from cardiovascular disease.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Yuhan Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Sandy Carrillo-Argueta - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Antoneta Karaj - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Social Determinates of Health and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

We have evidence to suggest that there is an association between inflammation and cardiovascular disease health. However, less is known about how social determinate of health, such as features of the built environment (e.g. neighborhood safety, urban vs. rural, etc.)…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We have evidence to suggest that there is an association between inflammation and cardiovascular disease health. However, less is known about how social determinate of health, such as features of the built environment (e.g. neighborhood safety, urban vs. rural, etc.) are associated with cardiovascular health through inflammation. Moreover, it is unclear how these mechanistic pathways from social determinates of health, through inflammation, to cardiovascular disease risk vary by key sociodemographic features like race/ethnicity and sexual orientation. Thus, the following investigation 2 has research questions.
1. Are environmental features (e.g. housing instability, neighborhood features, etc.) associated with physiological deregulation as measured by inflammation (e.g. cytokines, Interleukin’s, and c-reactive protein, biological markers of inflammation) and thus cardiovascular disease risk?
2. Do these associations vary by race and/or sexual orientation?

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease)

Scientific Approaches

For these analyses we will use the lab and survey data. We will specifically combine the data from 2017-2019 into one cross sectional dataset. Next, we will select the relevant variables and conduct descriptive statistics. For our formal analyses we will run structural equation models as well as a latent class analyses to better specify profiles of inflammation using cytokines, Interleukin’s, and c-reactive protein, and other biological markers of inflammation.

Anticipated Findings

We expect to;
a define meaningful profiles of inflammation;
b understand how social determinates of health are associated with cardiovascular disease through inflammation processes; and
c. understand how this process may vary by race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and the intersection of them both.

We believe this is an important contribution to the field given the lack of mechanistic inquiries related to social determinates of health and cardiovascular disease risk particularly for sexual and racial minorities.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Yumeng Ma - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Yingzhu Chen - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Xinyue Du - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Sixian Ju - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Yu-Ju Wang - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Social Determinates of Health and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

We have evidence to suggest that there is an association between inflammation and cardiovascular disease health. However, less is known about how social determinate of health, such as features of the built environment (e.g. neighborhood safety, urban vs. rural, etc.)…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We have evidence to suggest that there is an association between inflammation and cardiovascular disease health. However, less is known about how social determinate of health, such as features of the built environment (e.g. neighborhood safety, urban vs. rural, etc.) are associated with cardiovascular health through inflammation. Moreover, it is unclear how these mechanistic pathways from social determinates of health, through inflammation, to cardiovascular disease risk vary by key sociodemographic features like race/ethnicity and sexual orientation. Thus, the following investigation 2 has research questions.
1. Are environmental features (e.g. housing instability, neighborhood features, etc.) associated with physiological deregulation as measured by inflammation (e.g. cytokines, Interleukin’s, and c-reactive protein, biological markers of inflammation) and thus cardiovascular disease risk?
2. Do these associations vary by race and/or sexual orientation?

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

For these analyses we will use the lab and survey data. We will specifically combine the data from 2017-2019 into one cross sectional dataset. Next, we will select the relevant variables and conduct descriptive statistics. For our formal analyses we will run structural equation models as well as a latent class analyses to better specify profiles of inflammation using cytokines, Interleukin’s, and c-reactive protein, and other biological markers of inflammation.

Anticipated Findings

We expect to;
a define meaningful profiles of inflammation;
b understand how social determinates of health are associated with cardiovascular disease through inflammation processes; and
c. understand how this process may vary by race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, and the intersection of them both.

We believe this is an important contribution to the field given the lack of mechanistic inquiries related to social determinates of health and cardiovascular disease risk particularly for sexual and racial minorities.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Trajectories of Cardiovascular Risk Among Sexual and Gender Minorities v2

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention interventions to be optimally impactful. Further, it is important to understand the factors that may mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. In this analysis we will examine trajectories of cardiovascular risk in the All of Us longitudinal research cohort. In addition, we will examine differences in the trajectories by race, gender, sexual orientation and their intersection on trajectories of cardiovascular risk. Further, we will examine if features of social life like social support and residence mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. We anticipate clarifying how cardiovascular risk changes over time between multiple different ethic/racial, sexual orientation and gender groups.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (cardiovascular disease)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We will utilize the survey and biological datasets for this analysis, including the social determinants of health data. We will operationalize cardiovascular risk using a composite of cardiovascular risk factors including c-reactive protein, body mass index, etc. In addition, we will stratify our sample by biological sex due to the ways in which cardiovascular risk operate differentially between biological women and men. We will utilize generalized linear modeling to test our study hypothesis. Further, we will utilize the survey data in All of Us to determine how place of residence (e.g. urban vs. rural) and social support from friends or family may operate to lower cardiovascular risk overtime.

Anticipated Findings

This study will characterize how cardiovascular risk functions over time among sexual and gender minorities and specifically among sexual and gender minorities of color. This will allow us to more precisely establish when prevention interventions may be most effectively across time. In addition, examining potential "buffers" will allow us to explore new avenues where we may be able to create effective prevention interventions to protect SGM from cardiovascular disease.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Yuhan Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Sandy Carrillo-Argueta - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Antoneta Karaj - Graduate Trainee, New York University

PTSD and CVD Risk

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular disparities exist among men, such that those who identify as sexual minorities are more likely to experience poor cardiovascular health as compared to heterosexuals. The objective of this proposal is to examine physiological and behavioral mechanisms linking self-reported PTSD to cardiovascular disease risk. We also would like to understand the moderating effect of race/ethnicity. The long-term objective of this research is to inform the creation of culturally relevant interventions to reduce the risk of CVD among YSMM.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease)
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We will explore datasets that provide self-report information on the constructs discussed above as well as CVD measurements such as c-reactive protein.
1. Descriptive statistics. Descriptive statistics for all variables will be calculated. Distributional properties will be examined using summary statistics (e.g., mean, median, SD) and graphs (e.g., histograms and box plots). I will confirm psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency) of all scales. All management, basic analyses, and assumption testing will be done in R
2. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) will be used to asses if PTSD predicts mean CVD risk.
3. MLR will be used to assess if race/ethnicity moderated the association between PTSD and CVD risk.

Anticipated Findings

The mechanisms linking PTSD and intermediate cardiovascular factors among racially diverse individuals remain under-explored. Conducting this research is vitally important considering the heightened rates of both stress from discrimination and CVD disease. Secondly, understanding what the potential "buffers" are that mitigate the negative effects of PTSD on cardiovascular risk factors is critically important if we are going to create tailored interventions to reduce CVD.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

COVID, Discrimination, and Resilience

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences were for different groups of people. In addition, it is unknown how these experiences increased or decreased during high points in the pandemic. Lastly, it is unclear how social isolation and the disruption in human connection (e.g. with family, friends, etc.) may have been associated with the mental health effects of discrimination during the pandemic. This is of considerable public health significance because we must not only address the mental health needs of those in need, but understand the specific correlates of mental health, such as discrimination, to prevent such an uptick in mental health distress due to discrimination during the next pandemic.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I plan on using the COPE data source from May 2020-February 2021 to examine changes in experiences of discrimination, social isolation, human connection, and mental health. I will utilize hierarchical linear models to asses random and fixed effects, as well as potential mediators and moderators. The COPE has questions related to discrimination experiences in each wave, family connections, social isolation, and mental health. I will also utilize the main survey to access basic sociodemographic information (e.g. race/ethnicity, age, socio economic status, etc.) to utilize as covariates in my analyses.

Anticipated Findings

Based on the extant research literature, I believe that we will find that there is a general uptick in perceived discrimination during COVID. In addition, we hypothesize that as discrimination experiences increase, so does poor mental health. We also hypothesize that social isolation will mediate the longitudinal relationship between perceived discrimination and perceive social isolation and perceived mental health. Lastly, we hypothesize a mediated-moderated model whereby those with perceived positive human connections who experience greater discrimination will report less social isolation and thus less poor mental health compared to those with perceived negative human connections who experience greater discrimination.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Catherine Xin - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University

Trajectories of Cardiovascular Risk Among Sexual and Gender Minorities

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention interventions to be optimally impactful. Further, it is important to understand the factors that may mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. In this analysis we will examine trajectories of cardiovascular risk in the All of Us longitudinal research cohort. In addition, we will examine differences in the trajectories by race, gender, sexual orientation and their intersection on trajectories of cardiovascular risk. Further, we will examine if features of social life like social support and residence mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. We anticipate clarifying how cardiovascular risk changes over time between multiple different ethic/racial, sexual orientation and gender groups.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (cardiovascular disease)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We will utilize the survey and biological datasets for this analysis. We will operationalize cardiovascular risk using a composite of cardiovascular risk factors including c-reactive protein, body mass index, etc. In addition, we will stratify our sample by biological sex due to the ways in which cardiovascular risk operate differentially between biological women and men. We will utilize generalized linear modeling to test our study hypothesis. Further, we will utilize the survey data in All of Us to determine how place of residence (e.g. urban vs. rural) and social support from friends or family may operate to lower cardiovascular risk overtime.

Anticipated Findings

This study will characterize how cardiovascular risk functions over time among sexual and gender minorities and specifically among sexual and gender minorities of color. This will allow us to more precisely establish when prevention interventions may be most effectively across time. In addition, examining potential "buffers" will allow us to explore new avenues where we may be able to create effective prevention interventions to protect SGM from cardiovascular disease.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Yuhan Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Antoneta Karaj - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Understanding the Effects of Discrimination on Mental Health and Substance Use

The American Psychological Association describes discrimination as unfair or prejudicial treatment of people or groups based on characteristics such as race, gender, or sexual orientation (Discrimination: What it is, and how to cope, 2022). Discrimination is a social condition that…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

The American Psychological Association describes discrimination as unfair or prejudicial treatment of people or groups based on characteristics such as race, gender, or sexual orientation (Discrimination: What it is, and how to cope, 2022). Discrimination is a social condition that can be displayed in several ways. All forms of discrimination have been proven to be contributors to developing poor health outcomes. (Krieger, N., 2000). Among these poor health outcomes include anxiety, mood disorders, and substance use disorder. The study aims to examine the relationship between discrimination and anxiety, mood disorders, and alcohol and drug use. Using an exploratory analysis, we will look at these associations cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The study aims to find if there is a difference in the relationship based on identity (i.e. race) and if different types of discrimination are more prevalent among certain types of demographic groups including races/ethnicities and sex.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

To asses the relationship between discrimination and anxiety, mood disorders, and alcohol and drug use, we will utilize survey data and conditions data. We will use the Basics Survey to gather demographic information and descriptive statistics. We will use additional survey data surrounding discrimination and health experiences utilizing the COPE survey. We will control for COVID-19 related health data. Discrimination will be assessed using the Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS). Our study has three main outcomes: generalized anxiety disorder, which will be measured using the GAD scale, major depressive disorder, which will be measured using the PHQ-9 scale, and alcohol and drug use, which will be measured by the AUDIT screening tool. The basics survey will be used to help understand if race/ethnicity is a moderator of the association between discrimination and anxiety, mood disorders, and alcohol and drug use.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate to find an association between discrimination and anxiety, mood disorders, and alcohol and drug use. We expect to see that people who experience discrimination will also experience anxiety, mood disorders, and alcohol and drug use more than those who do not experience discrimination. We also anticipate finding a difference in the relationship based on identity and that race/ethnicity will be a moderator in this relationship. We anticipate that ethnic and racial minorities will have a stronger relationship between discrimination and said outcomes compared to non-racial ethnic minorities. We anticipate finding other demographic characteristics, such sex and sexual orientation, to be additional possible moderators of the relationship. The study will contribute to the body of scientific knowledge in the field by presenting additional information about and raising awareness on discrimination and its effect on health.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Emma Risner - Graduate Trainee, New York University

PTSD AND CVD

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular disparities exist among men, such that those who identify as sexual minorities are more likely to experience poor cardiovascular health as compared to heterosexuals. The objective of this proposal is to examine physiological and behavioral mechanisms linking self-reported PTSD to cardiovascular disease risk. We also would like to understand the moderating effect of race/ethnicity. The long-term objective of this research is to inform the creation of culturally relevant interventions to reduce the risk of CVD among YSMM. The proposed study specifically aims to:

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (CVD)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I will explore datasets that provide self report information on the constructs discussed above.
1. Descriptive statistics. Descriptive statistics for all variables will be calculated. Distributional properties will be examined using summary statistics (e.g., mean, median, SD) and graphs (e.g., histograms and box plots). I will confirm psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency) of all scales. All management, basic analyses, and assumption testing will be done in Stata 16.23 Hypothesis testing will be conducted in Mplus v8.24
2. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) will be used to asses if PTSD predicts mean CVD risk.
3. MLR will be used to assess if race/ethnicity moderated the association between PTSD and CVD risk.

Anticipated Findings

the mechanisms linking PTSD and intermediate cardiovascular factors among racially diverse individuals remain under-explored. Conducting this research is vitally important considering the heightened rates of both stress from discrimination and CVD disease. Secondly, understanding what the potential "buffers" are that mitigate the negative effects of PTSD on cardiovascular risk factors is critically important if we are going to create tailored interventions to reduce CVD.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Catherine Xin - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Discrimination, Social Isolation, and Support during the COIVD-19 Pandemic

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences were for different groups of people. In addition, it is unknown how these experiences increased or decreased during high points in the pandemic. Lastly, it is unclear how social isolation and the disruption in human connection (e.g. with family, friends, etc.) may have been associated with the mental health effects of discrimination during the pandemic. This is of considerable public health significance because we must not only address the mental health needs of those in need, but understand the specific correlates of mental health, such as discrimination, to prevent such an uptick in mental health distress due to discrimination during the next pandemic.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I plan on using the COPE data source from May 2020-February 2021 to examine changes in experiences of discrimination, social isolation, human connection, and mental health. I will utilize hierarchical linear models to asses random and fixed effects, as well as potential mediators and moderators. The COPE has questions related to discrimination experiences in each wave, family connections, social isolation, and mental health. I will also utilize the main survey to access basic sociodemographic information (e.g. race/ethnicity, age, socio economic status, etc.) to utilize as covariates in my analyses.

Anticipated Findings

Based on the extant research literature, I believe that we will find that there is a general uptick in perceived discrimination during COVID. In addition, we hypothesize that as discrimination experiences increase, so does poor mental health. We also hypothesize that social isolation will mediate the longitudinal relationship between perceived discrimination and perceive social isolation and perceived mental health. Lastly, we hypothesize a mediated-moderated model whereby those with perceived positive human connections who experience greater discrimination will report less social isolation and thus less poor mental health compared to those with perceived negative human connections who experience greater discrimination.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Catherine Xin - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Duplicate of Stephanie H. Cook - Project 1

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular disparities exist among men, such that those who identify as sexual minorities are more likely to experience poor cardiovascular health as compared to heterosexuals. The objective of this proposal is to examine physiological and behavioral mechanisms linking self-reported discrimination to ambulatory blood pressure, an intermediate outcome used to assess subclinical cardiovascular disease, in a racially diverse group of YSMM aged 18-35. The long-term objective of this research is to inform the creation of culturally relevant interventions to reduce the risk of CVD among YSMM. The proposed study specifically aims to:

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (CVD)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I will explore datasets that provide self report information on the constructs discussed above.
1. Descriptive statistics. Descriptive statistics for all variables will be calculated. Distributional properties will be examined using summary statistics (e.g., mean, median, SD) and graphs (e.g., histograms and box plots). I will confirm psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency) of all scales. All management, basic analyses, and assumption testing will be done in Stata 16.23 Hypothesis testing will be conducted in Mplus v8.24
2. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) will be used to asses if discrimination predicts mean CVD risk.
3. MLR will be used to assess if each of the individual health behaviors of substance use, sleep , and physical activity predicts mean CVD risk.
4. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) will be used. The Monte Carlo method for assessing mediation will be used

Anticipated Findings

the mechanisms linking discrimination and intermediate cardiovascular factors among racially diverse young sexual minority men (YSMM) remain underexplored. Conducting this research is vitally important considering the heightened rates of both stress from discrimination and subclinical cardiovascular disease among these potentially vulnerable populations. Secondly, understanding what the potential "buffers" are that mitigate the negative effects of intersectional discrimination on cardiovascular risk factors is critically important if we are going to create tailored interventions to reduce CVD among diverse YSMM.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sexual Orientation

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Duplicate of Stephanie H. Cook - Project 1

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular disparities exist among men, such that those who identify as sexual minorities are more likely to experience poor cardiovascular health as compared to heterosexuals. The objective of this proposal is to examine physiological and behavioral mechanisms linking self-reported PTSD to cardiovascular disease risk. We also would like to understand the moderating effect of race/ethnicity. The long-term objective of this research is to inform the creation of culturally relevant interventions to reduce the risk of CVD among YSMM. The proposed study specifically aims to:

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (CVD)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I will explore datasets that provide self report information on the constructs discussed above.
1. Descriptive statistics. Descriptive statistics for all variables will be calculated. Distributional properties will be examined using summary statistics (e.g., mean, median, SD) and graphs (e.g., histograms and box plots). I will confirm psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency) of all scales. All management, basic analyses, and assumption testing will be done in Stata 16.23 Hypothesis testing will be conducted in Mplus v8.24
2. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) will be used to asses if PTSD predicts mean CVD risk.
3. MLR will be used to assess if race/ethnicity moderated the association between PTSD and CVD risk.

Anticipated Findings

the mechanisms linking PTSD and intermediate cardiovascular factors among racially diverse individuals remain under-explored. Conducting this research is vitally important considering the heightened rates of both stress from discrimination and CVD disease. Secondly, understanding what the potential "buffers" are that mitigate the negative effects of PTSD on cardiovascular risk factors is critically important if we are going to create tailored interventions to reduce CVD.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Catherine Xin - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Stephanie H. Cook - Project 1

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular disparities exist among men, such that those who identify as sexual minorities are more likely to experience poor cardiovascular health as compared to heterosexuals. The objective of this proposal is to examine physiological and behavioral mechanisms linking self-reported discrimination to ambulatory blood pressure, an intermediate outcome used to assess subclinical cardiovascular disease, in a racially diverse group of YSMM aged 18-35. The long-term objective of this research is to inform the creation of culturally relevant interventions to reduce the risk of CVD among YSMM. The proposed study specifically aims to:

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (CVD)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I will explore datasets that provide self report information on the constructs discussed above.
1. Descriptive statistics. Descriptive statistics for all variables will be calculated. Distributional properties will be examined using summary statistics (e.g., mean, median, SD) and graphs (e.g., histograms and box plots). I will confirm psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency) of all scales. All management, basic analyses, and assumption testing will be done in Stata 16.23 Hypothesis testing will be conducted in Mplus v8.24
2. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) will be used to asses if discrimination predicts mean CVD risk.
3. MLR will be used to assess if each of the individual health behaviors of substance use, sleep , and physical activity predicts mean CVD risk.
4. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) will be used. The Monte Carlo method for assessing mediation will be used

Anticipated Findings

the mechanisms linking discrimination and intermediate cardiovascular factors among racially diverse young sexual minority men (YSMM) remain underexplored. Conducting this research is vitally important considering the heightened rates of both stress from discrimination and subclinical cardiovascular disease among these potentially vulnerable populations. Secondly, understanding what the potential "buffers" are that mitigate the negative effects of intersectional discrimination on cardiovascular risk factors is critically important if we are going to create tailored interventions to reduce CVD among diverse YSMM.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sexual Orientation

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University

Collaborators:

  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University
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