Neil Zheng

Graduate Trainee, Yale University

3 active projects

PheWAS Fitbit Activity

Identify whether it is feasible to perform a phenome-wide association study using Fitbit-derived physical activity data.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Identify whether it is feasible to perform a phenome-wide association study using Fitbit-derived physical activity data.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Methods Development

Scientific Approaches

We will plan to use Fitbit-derived physical activity data and phecodes derived from conditions table to perform a phenome-wide association study.

Anticipated Findings

Determining whether a PheWAS is feasible using Fitbit physical activity may help find novel associations between physical activity and disease development.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Diverticulosis

We are exploring the association between demographic and lifestyle risk factors on diverticulosis.

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We are exploring the association between demographic and lifestyle risk factors on diverticulosis.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Diverticulosis)

Scientific Approaches

We plan to identify a cohort of patients with diverticulosis and identify risk factors via regression models.

Anticipated Findings

Improving our understanding of the epidemiology of diverticulosis may improve improve diagnosis, management, and outcomes in vulnerable populations.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

GI Bleed Antithrombotics

Anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents (including aspirin) are commonly used medications that are known risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients are prescribed these agents as monotherapies or as combination therapy, such as double or triple antithrombotic therapy. It is not…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents (including aspirin) are commonly used medications that are known risk factors for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patients are prescribed these agents as monotherapies or as combination therapy, such as double or triple antithrombotic therapy. It is not well understood if long-term monotherapy or combination therapy with these medications affects outcomes for patients who develop UGIB while taking these agents. We aim to investigate post-endoscopic outcomes for patients on antithrombotic therapies who present to the hospital with acute gastrointestinal bleeds.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Gastrointestinal bleeding)

Scientific Approaches

Identify cohort of patients presenting with acute gastrointestinal bleeding and with long-term aspirin monotherapy, double antithrombotic therapy, and triple antithrombotic therapy.

Investigate post-endoscopic outcomes with regression models.

Anticipated Findings

Identifying whether monotherapy or combination therapy of antithrombotics is associated with higher risk of adverse post-endoscopic outcomes will be valuable in guiding decision-making on holding or reinitiating of antithrombotics therapy.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

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