Nicholas Woods

Senior Researcher, University of Nebraska Medical Center

4 active projects

Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer and racial health disparities v2

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular differences likely contribute to these disparities. Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer are prognostic of overall survival for White patients, but not for Blacks. It is possible that the lack of Black participants in the existing studies has resulted in an inaccurate subtype classification system for underrepresented minorities. Since subtype classification is starting to be used to stratify patients into treatment groups, it is essential to understand whether the current classifications are clinically relevant to minorities and to build new inclusive, meaningful models if they are not.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (pancreatic cancer)

Scientific Approaches

We will use multivariate analysis of gene signature profiles between groups defined by self-identified race based on RNA-seq, proteomic, and genomic data. Consensus clustering and dimensional reduction techniques such as principal component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization will be used to identify subtypes of pancreatic cancer and compare their associations with race.

Anticipated Findings

We expect that that current classification models for describing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are inaccurate at identifying clinical relevant subtypes in PDACs originating in Black patients. This will indicate new models are required. Alternatively, the models may accurately ascribe subtypes regardless of differences associated with race, which would indicate exogenous factors such as social determinants could negatively affect the predictive capacity of molecular subtyping in minority populations. We anticipate this study will be able to distinguish the endogenous and exogenous determinants of subtype classification and their application as prognostic and predictive biomarkers across racial groups with the intention of mitigating the health disparities observed in pancreatic cancer.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Nicholas Woods - Senior Researcher, University of Nebraska Medical Center

Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer and racial health disparities

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular differences likely contribute to these disparities. Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer are prognostic of overall survival for White patients, but not for Blacks. It is possible that the lack of Black participants in the existing studies has resulted in an inaccurate subtype classification system for underrepresented minorities. Since subtype classification is starting to be used to stratify patients into treatment groups, it is essential to understand whether the current classifications are clinically relevant to minorities and to build new inclusive, meaningful models if they are not.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (pancreatic cancer)

Scientific Approaches

We will use multivariate analysis of gene signature profiles between groups defined by self-identified race based on RNA-seq, proteomic, and genomic data. Consensus clustering and dimensional reduction techniques such as principal component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization will be used to identify subtypes of pancreatic cancer and compare their associations with race.

Anticipated Findings

We expect that that current classification models for describing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are inaccurate at identifying clinical relevant subtypes in PDACs originating in Black patients. This will indicate new models are required. Alternatively, the models may accurately ascribe subtypes regardless of differences associated with race, which would indicate exogenous factors such as social determinants could negatively affect the predictive capacity of molecular subtyping in minority populations. We anticipate this study will be able to distinguish the endogenous and exogenous determinants of subtype classification and their application as prognostic and predictive biomarkers across racial groups with the intention of mitigating the health disparities observed in pancreatic cancer.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Nicholas Woods - Senior Researcher, University of Nebraska Medical Center

Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer and racial health disparities

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular differences likely contribute to these disparities. Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer are prognostic of overall survival for White patients, but not for Blacks. It is possible that the lack of Black participants in the existing studies has resulted in an inaccurate subtype classification system for underrepresented minorities. Since subtype classification is starting to be used to stratify patients into treatment groups, it is essential to understand whether the current classifications are clinically relevant to minorities and to build new inclusive, meaningful models if they are not.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (pancreatic cancer)

Scientific Approaches

We will use multivariate analysis of gene signature profiles between groups defined by self-identified race based on RNA-seq, proteomic, and genomic data. Consensus clustering and dimensional reduction techniques such as principal component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization will be used to identify subtypes of pancreatic cancer and compare their associations with race.

Anticipated Findings

We expect that that current classification models for describing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are inaccurate at identifying clinical relevant subtypes in PDACs originating in Black patients. This will indicate new models are required. Alternatively, the models may accurately ascribe subtypes regardless of differences associated with race, which would indicate exogenous factors such as social determinants could negatively affect the predictive capacity of molecular subtyping in minority populations. We anticipate this study will be able to distinguish the endogenous and exogenous determinants of subtype classification and their application as prognostic and predictive biomarkers across racial groups with the intention of mitigating the health disparities observed in pancreatic cancer.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Nicholas Woods - Senior Researcher, University of Nebraska Medical Center

Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer and racial health disparities

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Latinx/Hispanic (L/H) patients have a significant survival advantage over Blacks and Whites with PDAC. Blacks experience the highest incidence rates and worse clinical outcomes compared to Whites and L/H even when socioeconomic and tumor stages are controlled, suggesting unknown molecular differences likely contribute to these disparities. Molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer are prognostic of overall survival for White patients, but not for Blacks. It is possible that the lack of Black participants in the existing studies has resulted in an inaccurate subtype classification system for underrepresented minorities. Since subtype classification is starting to be used to stratify patients into treatment groups, it is essential to understand whether the current classifications are clinically relevant to minorities and to build new inclusive, meaningful models if they are not.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma)

Scientific Approaches

We will use multivariate analysis of gene signature profiles between groups defined by self-identified race based on RNA-seq, proteomic, and genomic data. Consensus clustering and dimensional reduction techniques such as principal component analysis and non-negative matrix factorization will be used to identify subtypes of pancreatic cancer and compare their associations with race.

Anticipated Findings

We expect that that current classification models for describing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma are inaccurate at identifying clinical relevant subtypes in PDACs originating in Black patients. This will indicate new models are required. Alternatively, the models may accurately ascribe subtypes regardless of differences associated with race, which would indicate exogenous factors such as social determinants could negatively affect the predictive capacity of molecular subtyping in minority populations. We anticipate this study will be able to distinguish the endogenous and exogenous determinants of subtype classification and their application as prognostic and predictive biomarkers across racial groups with the intention of mitigating the health disparities observed in pancreatic cancer.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Nicholas Woods - Senior Researcher, University of Nebraska Medical Center
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