Indra Adrianto

Mid-career Tenured Researcher, Henry Ford Health System

2 active projects

Duplicate of Genetics of Hidradenitis Suppurativa v6

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and remitting inflammatory disease of the skin, with a prevalence up to 4% of general population. However, the factors that contribute to HS risk are poorly understood. The difference in the risk of…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and remitting inflammatory disease of the skin, with a prevalence up to 4% of general population. However, the factors that contribute to HS risk are poorly understood. The difference in the risk of HS by ethnicity in the US is striking. Specifically, African Americans have established prevalence and incidence rates that are approximately 3-fold higher than their European American counterparts. Further, African American patients exhibit higher disease severity and the greatest number of co-morbid conditions. Despite these differences, there have been no studies that have provided insight into the contributors to these extreme HS racial disparities. The overall goal of this project is to define the genetic contributors to HS risk in African Americans in comparison with European Americans using the All of US genetic data including genome-wide association study (GWAS) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Hidradenitis Suppurativa)
  • Methods Development
  • Control Set
  • Ancestry

Scientific Approaches

Our central hypothesis is that germline variation contributes to the risk of HS in African American patients, which is different from European American counterparts. We will evaluate our hypothesis through the following aims. In Aim 1, we will utilize the All of Us WGS and GWAS data of HS cases and matched controls to identify common genetic variation associated with HS risk in African Americans and European Americans. In Aim 2, we utilize the All of Us WGS data of HS cases to identify potentially pathogenic mutations of HS.

Anticipated Findings

Successful completion of this project will provide the first insights into the genetic contributions to risk of HS, which may unveil new therapeutic targets and treatments in HS.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Indra Adrianto - Mid-career Tenured Researcher, Henry Ford Health System

Collaborators:

  • Ze Meng - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Henry Ford Health System
  • Hongsheng Gui - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Henry Ford Health System

Genetics of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and remitting inflammatory disease of the skin, with a prevalence up to 4% of general population. However, the factors that contribute to HS risk are poorly understood. The difference in the risk of…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic, relapsing, and remitting inflammatory disease of the skin, with a prevalence up to 4% of general population. However, the factors that contribute to HS risk are poorly understood. The difference in the risk of HS by ethnicity in the US is striking. Specifically, African Americans have established prevalence and incidence rates that are approximately 3-fold higher than their European American counterparts. Further, African American patients exhibit higher disease severity and the greatest number of co-morbid conditions. Despite these differences, there have been no studies that have provided insight into the contributors to these extreme HS racial disparities. The overall goal of this project is to define the genetic contributors to HS risk in African Americans in comparison with European Americans using the All of US genetic data including genome-wide association study (GWAS) and whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Hidradenitis Suppurativa)
  • Methods Development
  • Control Set
  • Ancestry

Scientific Approaches

Our central hypothesis is that germline variation contributes to the risk of HS in African American patients, which is different from European American counterparts. We will evaluate our hypothesis through the following aims. In Aim 1, we will utilize the All of Us WGS and GWAS data of HS cases and matched controls to identify common genetic variation associated with HS risk in African Americans and European Americans. In Aim 2, we utilize the All of Us WGS data of HS cases to identify potentially pathogenic mutations of HS.

Anticipated Findings

Successful completion of this project will provide the first insights into the genetic contributions to risk of HS, which may unveil new therapeutic targets and treatments in HS.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Indra Adrianto - Mid-career Tenured Researcher, Henry Ford Health System

Collaborators:

  • Ze Meng - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Henry Ford Health System
  • Hongsheng Gui - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, Henry Ford Health System
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