Erica Wood

Graduate Trainee, New York University

2 active projects

Trajectories of Cardiovascular Risk Among Sexual and Gender Minorities v2

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention interventions to be optimally impactful. Further, it is important to understand the factors that may mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. In this analysis we will examine trajectories of cardiovascular risk in the All of Us longitudinal research cohort. In addition, we will examine differences in the trajectories by race, gender, sexual orientation and their intersection on trajectories of cardiovascular risk. Further, we will examine if features of social life like social support and residence mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. We anticipate clarifying how cardiovascular risk changes over time between multiple different ethic/racial, sexual orientation and gender groups.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (cardiovascular disease)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We will utilize the survey and biological datasets for this analysis, including the social determinants of health data. We will operationalize cardiovascular risk using a composite of cardiovascular risk factors including c-reactive protein, body mass index, etc. In addition, we will stratify our sample by biological sex due to the ways in which cardiovascular risk operate differentially between biological women and men. We will utilize generalized linear modeling to test our study hypothesis. Further, we will utilize the survey data in All of Us to determine how place of residence (e.g. urban vs. rural) and social support from friends or family may operate to lower cardiovascular risk overtime.

Anticipated Findings

This study will characterize how cardiovascular risk functions over time among sexual and gender minorities and specifically among sexual and gender minorities of color. This will allow us to more precisely establish when prevention interventions may be most effectively across time. In addition, examining potential "buffers" will allow us to explore new avenues where we may be able to create effective prevention interventions to protect SGM from cardiovascular disease.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Yuhan Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Sandy Carrillo-Argueta - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Antoneta Karaj - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Trajectories of Cardiovascular Risk Among Sexual and Gender Minorities

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Sexual and Gender Minorities (SGM), SGM of color in particular, have heightened rates of cardiovascular disease. However, it is not clear how cardiovascular disease risk changes over time. This is vitally important information due to the importance of timing prevention interventions to be optimally impactful. Further, it is important to understand the factors that may mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. In this analysis we will examine trajectories of cardiovascular risk in the All of Us longitudinal research cohort. In addition, we will examine differences in the trajectories by race, gender, sexual orientation and their intersection on trajectories of cardiovascular risk. Further, we will examine if features of social life like social support and residence mitigate the negative effects of cardiovascular disease. We anticipate clarifying how cardiovascular risk changes over time between multiple different ethic/racial, sexual orientation and gender groups.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (cardiovascular disease)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We will utilize the survey and biological datasets for this analysis. We will operationalize cardiovascular risk using a composite of cardiovascular risk factors including c-reactive protein, body mass index, etc. In addition, we will stratify our sample by biological sex due to the ways in which cardiovascular risk operate differentially between biological women and men. We will utilize generalized linear modeling to test our study hypothesis. Further, we will utilize the survey data in All of Us to determine how place of residence (e.g. urban vs. rural) and social support from friends or family may operate to lower cardiovascular risk overtime.

Anticipated Findings

This study will characterize how cardiovascular risk functions over time among sexual and gender minorities and specifically among sexual and gender minorities of color. This will allow us to more precisely establish when prevention interventions may be most effectively across time. In addition, examining potential "buffers" will allow us to explore new avenues where we may be able to create effective prevention interventions to protect SGM from cardiovascular disease.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Stephanie Cook - Early Career Tenure-track Researcher, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

Collaborators:

  • Yuhan Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Antoneta Karaj - Graduate Trainee, New York University
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