Lizette Mendez

Project Personnel, Boston Medical Center

6 active projects

V5 Demo - Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy

1. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy? 2. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy by demographics? Of those diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, what is the epidemiology of the risk factors associated…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

1. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy? 2. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy by demographics? Of those diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, what is the epidemiology of the risk factors associated with hypertension in pregnancy? 3. Are there racial disparities in hypertension during pregnancy, when adjusted for these risk factors? 4. How can one use heterogeneous data sources within the All of Us dataset to explore disease associations using self-reported exposures (Participant Provided Information, or “PPI”) and exposures captured in the electronic medical record (EHR).”

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy)
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Other Purpose (This work is a result of an All of Us Research Program Demonstration Project. The projects are efforts by the Program designed to meet the program's goal of ensuring the quality and utility of the Research Hub as a resource for accelerating discovery in science and medicine. This work was reviewed and overseen by the All of Us Research Program Science Committee and the Data and Research Center to ensure compliance with program policy, including policies for acceptable data access and use.)

Scientific Approaches

Our sample was pulled from the 78,938 females in the AoU cohort who had EHR and PPI data. Females were identified as participants with female sex assigned at birth. Of these, only the 13,155 females who had at least 1 SNOMED code in their EHR as "pregnancy finding" were included in the analysis. For our analyses, a participant was classified as having a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy if they had at least one SNOMED code for gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia with or without severe features, eclampsia, or HELLP Syndrome. We used published risk factors for preeclampsia as described by the United States Preventive Services Task Force in our univariate and multivariate analysis. Odds ratios were calculated for the risk factors. Descriptive statistics for the overall pregnant female cohort and the hypertensive disorder of pregnancy cohort were also classified. We used both EHR and PPI data to identify the risk factors for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate to see racial disparities in the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Similar to previous literature, we anticipate our results will show participants who identify as African American are at greater odds of being diagnosed with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy compared to White participants. We also anticipate finding higher odds of being diagnosed with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among participants who have at least one risk factor for preeclampsia as described by USPSTF compared to participants without any risk factors. This study will serve to demonstrate the quality, utility, and diversity of the All of Us data and tools, providing researchers options for study design and validation.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

V5 data Demo - Uterine Fibroids

From this analysis, we hope to observe if there are differences in age, racial and risk distribution between both fibroids diagnostic cohorts. We also will determine the odds of this condition in both cohorts, based on modifiable risk factors such…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

From this analysis, we hope to observe if there are differences in age, racial and risk distribution between both fibroids diagnostic cohorts. We also will determine the odds of this condition in both cohorts, based on modifiable risk factors such as age, race and menopausal state and non-modifiable risk factors like obesity, use of hormones and smoking. These findings will be compared to findings from pre-existing data.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Uterine fibroids or leiomyomas)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Methods Development
  • Other Purpose (“This work is a result of an All of Us Research Program Demonstration Project. The projects are efforts by the Program designed to meet the program's goal of ensuring the quality and utility of the Research Hub as a resource for accelerating discovery in science and medicine. This work was reviewed and overseen by the All of Us Research Program Science Committee and the Data and Research Center to ensure compliance with program policy, including policies for acceptable data access and use”.)

Scientific Approaches

Participants were eligible if they were assigned female sex at birth and had both Electronic Health Records (EHR) data and Patient Provided Information (PPI). Two fibroids cohorts were created based on: 1. Presence of at least one SNOMED code for uterine fibroids in their Electronic Health Records 2. Presence of one ICD-9 or CPT code for pelvic imaging (e.g., pelvic ultrasound) and one diagnostic code for uterine fibroids Variables of interest were identified from the EHR and PPI and imported as concept sets into the notebook, otherwise they were created in the notebook. Data was analyzed in R software version 3.6.2, 2019.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate that black females will have higher odds of fibroids compared to white women and that smokers will have lower odds of fibroids compared to non-smokers. While findings from this analysis are not novel, they validate existing knowledge and underscore the importance of the AoU data cohort in research. Furthermore, AoU cohort data represents females in the United States and Canada and, importantly, populations that are underrepresented in research.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Sex at Birth
  • Geography
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

Demo - Uterine Fibroids

From this analysis, we hope to observe if there are differences in age, racial and risk distribution between both fibroids diagnostic cohorts. We also will determine the odds of this condition in both cohorts, based on modifiable risk factors such…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

From this analysis, we hope to observe if there are differences in age, racial and risk distribution between both fibroids diagnostic cohorts. We also will determine the odds of this condition in both cohorts, based on modifiable risk factors such as age, race and menopausal state and non-modifiable risk factors like obesity, use of hormones and smoking. These findings will be compared to findings from pre-existing data.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Uterine fibroids or leiomyomas)
  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Methods Development
  • Other Purpose (“This work is a result of an All of Us Research Program Demonstration Project. The projects are efforts by the Program designed to meet the program's goal of ensuring the quality and utility of the Research Hub as a resource for accelerating discovery in science and medicine. This work was reviewed and overseen by the All of Us Research Program Science Committee and the Data and Research Center to ensure compliance with program policy, including policies for acceptable data access and use”.)

Scientific Approaches

Participants were eligible if they were assigned female sex at birth and had both Electronic Health Records (EHR) data and Patient Provided Information (PPI). Two fibroids cohorts were created based on: 1. Presence of at least one SNOMED code for uterine fibroids in their Electronic Health Records 2. Presence of one ICD-9 or CPT code for pelvic imaging (e.g., pelvic ultrasound) and one diagnostic code for uterine fibroids Variables of interest were identified from the EHR and PPI and imported as concept sets into the notebook, otherwise they were created in the notebook. Data was analyzed in R software version 3.6.2, 2019.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate that black females will have higher odds of fibroids compared to white women and that smokers will have lower odds of fibroids compared to non-smokers. While findings from this analysis are not novel, they validate existing knowledge and underscore the importance of the AoU data cohort in research. Furthermore, AoU cohort data represents females in the United States and Canada and, importantly, populations that are underrepresented in research.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Sex at Birth
  • Geography
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Guohai Zhou - Other, Mass General Brigham

Demo - Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy

1. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy? 2. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy by demographics? Of those diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, what is the epidemiology of the risk factors associated…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

1. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy? 2. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy by demographics? Of those diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, what is the epidemiology of the risk factors associated with hypertension in pregnancy? 3. Are there racial disparities in hypertension during pregnancy, when adjusted for these risk factors? 4. How can one use heterogeneous data sources within the All of Us dataset to explore disease associations using self-reported exposures (Participant Provided Information, or “PPI”) and exposures captured in the electronic medical record (EHR).”

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy)
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Other Purpose (This work is a result of an All of Us Research Program Demonstration Project. The projects are efforts by the Program designed to meet the program's goal of ensuring the quality and utility of the Research Hub as a resource for accelerating discovery in science and medicine. This work was reviewed and overseen by the All of Us Research Program Science Committee and the Data and Research Center to ensure compliance with program policy, including policies for acceptable data access and use.)

Scientific Approaches

Our sample was pulled from the 78,938 females in the AoU cohort who had EHR and PPI data. Females were identified as participants with female sex assigned at birth. Of these, only the 13,155 females who had at least 1 SNOMED code in their EHR as "pregnancy finding" were included in the analysis. For our analyses, a participant was classified as having a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy if they had at least one SNOMED code for gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia with or without severe features, eclampsia, or HELLP Syndrome. We used published risk factors for preeclampsia as described by the United States Preventive Services Task Force in our univariate and multivariate analysis. Odds ratios were calculated for the risk factors. Descriptive statistics for the overall pregnant female cohort and the hypertensive disorder of pregnancy cohort were also classified. We used both EHR and PPI data to identify the risk factors for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate to see racial disparities in the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Similar to previous literature, we anticipate our results will show participants who identify as African American are at greater odds of being diagnosed with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy compared to White participants. We also anticipate finding higher odds of being diagnosed with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among participants who have at least one risk factor for preeclampsia as described by USPSTF compared to participants without any risk factors. This study will serve to demonstrate the quality, utility, and diversity of the All of Us data and tools, providing researchers options for study design and validation.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Francis Ratsimbazafy - Other, All of Us Program Operational Use
  • Guohai Zhou - Other, Mass General Brigham

Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy

1. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy? 2. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy by demographics? Of those diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, what is the epidemiology of the risk factors associated…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

1. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy?
2. What is the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy by demographics? Of those diagnosed with a hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, what is the epidemiology of the risk factors associated with hypertension in pregnancy?
3. Are there racial disparities in hypertension during pregnancy, when adjusted for these risk factors?
4. How can one use heterogeneous data sources within the All of Us dataset to explore disease associations using self-reported exposures (Participant Provided Information, or “PPI”) and exposures captured in the electronic medical record (EHR).”

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (Hypertensive disorder of pregnancy)
  • Social / Behavioral
  • Other Purpose (This work is a result of an All of Us Research Program Demonstration Project. The projects are efforts by the Program designed to meet the program's goal of ensuring the quality and utility of the Research Hub as a resource for accelerating discovery in science and medicine. This work was reviewed and overseen by the All of Us Research Program Science Committee and the Data and Research Center to ensure compliance with program policy, including policies for acceptable data access and use.)

Scientific Approaches

Our sample was pulled from the 78,938 females in the AoU cohort who had EHR and PPI data. Females were identified as participants with female sex assigned at birth. Of these, only the 13,155 females who had at least 1 SNOMED code in their EHR as "pregnancy finding" were included in the analysis. For our analyses, a participant was classified as having a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy if they had at least one SNOMED code for gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia with or without severe features, eclampsia, or HELLP Syndrome. We used published risk factors for preeclampsia as described by the United States Preventive Services Task Force in our univariate and multivariate analysis. Odds ratios were calculated for the risk factors. Descriptive statistics for the overall pregnant female cohort and the hypertensive disorder of pregnancy cohort were also classified. We used both EHR and PPI data to identify the risk factors for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

Anticipated Findings

We anticipate to see racial disparities in the prevalence of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. Similar to previous literature, we anticipate our results will show participants who identify as African American are at greater odds of being diagnosed with hypertensive disorder of pregnancy compared to White participants. We also anticipate finding higher odds of being diagnosed with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy among participants who have at least one risk factor for preeclampsia as described by USPSTF compared to participants without any risk factors. This study will serve to demonstrate the quality, utility, and diversity of the All of Us data and tools, providing researchers options for study design and validation.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Roxana Loperena Cortes - Other, All of Us Program Operational Use
  • Francis Ratsimbazafy - Other, All of Us Program Operational Use
  • Nyia Noel - Mid-career Tenured Researcher, Boston Medical Center
  • Confidence Achilike - Project Personnel, Boston Medical Center
  • Guohai Zhou - Other, Mass General Brigham

breast cancer tutorial

epidemiology of breast cancer

Scientific Questions Being Studied

epidemiology of breast cancer

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

Not available.

Anticipated Findings

disparities

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Research Team

Owner:

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