Catherine Xin

Graduate Trainee, New York University

2 active projects

Housing Insecurity and Mental Wellbeing v6 CT

This exploratory analysis will examine the association between housing insecurity and the impact of COVID-19 on participant health and mental health as measured in the COPE surveys. The initial exploration will assess whether the sample sizes and cross-tabulations are sufficient…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

This exploratory analysis will examine the association between housing insecurity and the impact of COVID-19 on participant health and mental health as measured in the COPE surveys. The initial exploration will assess whether the sample sizes and cross-tabulations are sufficient to proceed with a research project examining the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on housing insecure individuals, as compared to securely-housed individuals.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

This analysis will pull data from the Basics survey and the COPE surveys to examine whether answers in the COPE surveys can be broken down by differential housing circumstances. This will include summary and bivariate analyses.

Anticipated Findings

We hypothesize that housing insecurity will be associated with enduring worse health and mental health outcomes as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
This research project seeks to reduce health disparities and improve health equity in underrepresented in biomedical research (UBR) populations.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Binyu Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Chenziheng Weng - Graduate Trainee, New York University

V6_COVID, Discrimination, and Resilience

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences were for different groups of people. In addition, it is unknown how these experiences increased or decreased during high points in the pandemic. Lastly, it is unclear how social isolation and the disruption in human connection (e.g. with family, friends, etc.) may have been associated with the mental health effects of discrimination during the pandemic. This is of considerable public health significance because we must not only address the mental health needs of those in need, but understand the specific correlates of mental health, such as discrimination, to prevent such an uptick in mental health distress due to discrimination during the next pandemic.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I plan on using the COPE data source from May 2020-February 2021 to examine changes in experiences of discrimination, social isolation, human connection, and mental health. I will utilize hierarchical linear models to asses random and fixed effects, as well as potential mediators and moderators. The COPE has questions related to discrimination experiences in each wave, family connections, social isolation, and mental health. I will also utilize the main survey to access basic sociodemographic information (e.g. race/ethnicity, age, socio economic status, etc.) to utilize as covariates in my analyses.

Anticipated Findings

Based on the extant research literature, I believe that we will find that there is a general uptick in perceived discrimination during COVID. In addition, we hypothesize that as discrimination experiences increase, so does poor mental health. We also hypothesize that social isolation will mediate the longitudinal relationship between perceived discrimination and perceive social isolation and perceived mental health. Lastly, we hypothesize a mediated-moderated model whereby those with perceived positive human connections who experience greater discrimination will report less social isolation and thus less poor mental health compared to those with perceived negative human connections who experience greater discrimination.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

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