Chenziheng Weng

Graduate Trainee, New York University

4 active projects

Code repository for GPH researchers (Allen W. built under S Cook)

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences were for different groups of people. In addition, it is unknown how these experiences increased or decreased during high points in the pandemic. Lastly, it is unclear how social isolation and the disruption in human connection (e.g. with family, friends, etc.) may have been associated with the mental health effects of discrimination during the pandemic. This is of considerable public health significance because we must not only address the mental health needs of those in need, but understand the specific correlates of mental health, such as discrimination, to prevent such an uptick in mental health distress due to discrimination during the next pandemic.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Methods Development

Scientific Approaches

I plan on using the COPE data source from May 2020-February 2021 to examine changes in experiences of discrimination, social isolation, human connection, and mental health. I will utilize hierarchical linear models to asses random and fixed effects, as well as potential mediators and moderators. The COPE has questions related to discrimination experiences in each wave, family connections, social isolation, and mental health. I will also utilize the main survey to access basic sociodemographic information (e.g. race/ethnicity, age, socio economic status, etc.) to utilize as covariates in my analyses.

Anticipated Findings

Based on the extant research literature, I believe that we will find that there is a general uptick in perceived discrimination during COVID. In addition, we hypothesize that as discrimination experiences increase, so does poor mental health. We also hypothesize that social isolation will mediate the longitudinal relationship between perceived discrimination and perceive social isolation and perceived mental health. Lastly, we hypothesize a mediated-moderated model whereby those with perceived positive human connections who experience greater discrimination will report less social isolation and thus less poor mental health compared to those with perceived negative human connections who experience greater discrimination.

Demographic Categories of Interest

This study will not center on underrepresented populations.

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Yuhan Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Yiwen Chen - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Hsing-Chun Wang - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Tingjia Shi - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Sherry Wu - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Sydney Hagley-Alexander - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Sandy Carrillo-Argueta - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Jose Pagan - Late Career Tenured Researcher, New York University
  • Jingwen Lei - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Emma Risner - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Naiyue Liang - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Binyu Cui - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • Antoneta Karaj - Graduate Trainee, New York University

V6_COVID, Discrimination, and Resilience

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences were for different groups of people. In addition, it is unknown how these experiences increased or decreased during high points in the pandemic. Lastly, it is unclear how social isolation and the disruption in human connection (e.g. with family, friends, etc.) may have been associated with the mental health effects of discrimination during the pandemic. This is of considerable public health significance because we must not only address the mental health needs of those in need, but understand the specific correlates of mental health, such as discrimination, to prevent such an uptick in mental health distress due to discrimination during the next pandemic.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I plan on using the COPE data source from May 2020-February 2021 to examine changes in experiences of discrimination, social isolation, human connection, and mental health. I will utilize hierarchical linear models to asses random and fixed effects, as well as potential mediators and moderators. The COPE has questions related to discrimination experiences in each wave, family connections, social isolation, and mental health. I will also utilize the main survey to access basic sociodemographic information (e.g. race/ethnicity, age, socio economic status, etc.) to utilize as covariates in my analyses.

Anticipated Findings

Based on the extant research literature, I believe that we will find that there is a general uptick in perceived discrimination during COVID. In addition, we hypothesize that as discrimination experiences increase, so does poor mental health. We also hypothesize that social isolation will mediate the longitudinal relationship between perceived discrimination and perceive social isolation and perceived mental health. Lastly, we hypothesize a mediated-moderated model whereby those with perceived positive human connections who experience greater discrimination will report less social isolation and thus less poor mental health compared to those with perceived negative human connections who experience greater discrimination.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

PTSD and CVD Risk

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among men and women over the age of 65 in the United States, men account for more than half of the deaths due to CVD. Moreover, evidence suggests that cardiovascular disparities exist among men, such that those who identify as sexual minorities are more likely to experience poor cardiovascular health as compared to heterosexuals. The objective of this proposal is to examine physiological and behavioral mechanisms linking self-reported PTSD to cardiovascular disease risk. We also would like to understand the moderating effect of race/ethnicity. The long-term objective of this research is to inform the creation of culturally relevant interventions to reduce the risk of CVD among YSMM.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Disease Focused Research (arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease)
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We will explore datasets that provide self-report information on the constructs discussed above as well as CVD measurements such as c-reactive protein.
1. Descriptive statistics. Descriptive statistics for all variables will be calculated. Distributional properties will be examined using summary statistics (e.g., mean, median, SD) and graphs (e.g., histograms and box plots). I will confirm psychometric properties (e.g., internal consistency) of all scales. All management, basic analyses, and assumption testing will be done in R
2. Multivariate linear regression (MLR) will be used to asses if PTSD predicts mean CVD risk.
3. MLR will be used to assess if race/ethnicity moderated the association between PTSD and CVD risk.

Anticipated Findings

The mechanisms linking PTSD and intermediate cardiovascular factors among racially diverse individuals remain under-explored. Conducting this research is vitally important considering the heightened rates of both stress from discrimination and CVD disease. Secondly, understanding what the potential "buffers" are that mitigate the negative effects of PTSD on cardiovascular risk factors is critically important if we are going to create tailored interventions to reduce CVD.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
  • Erica Wood - Graduate Trainee, New York University

COVID, Discrimination, and Resilience

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Researcher have shown that there was an increase in discrimination some points of the COVID-19 pandemic. Many researchers have suggested a myriad of reasons why this may be. However, it remains unclear what the correlates and distribution of discrimination experiences were for different groups of people. In addition, it is unknown how these experiences increased or decreased during high points in the pandemic. Lastly, it is unclear how social isolation and the disruption in human connection (e.g. with family, friends, etc.) may have been associated with the mental health effects of discrimination during the pandemic. This is of considerable public health significance because we must not only address the mental health needs of those in need, but understand the specific correlates of mental health, such as discrimination, to prevent such an uptick in mental health distress due to discrimination during the next pandemic.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

I plan on using the COPE data source from May 2020-February 2021 to examine changes in experiences of discrimination, social isolation, human connection, and mental health. I will utilize hierarchical linear models to asses random and fixed effects, as well as potential mediators and moderators. The COPE has questions related to discrimination experiences in each wave, family connections, social isolation, and mental health. I will also utilize the main survey to access basic sociodemographic information (e.g. race/ethnicity, age, socio economic status, etc.) to utilize as covariates in my analyses.

Anticipated Findings

Based on the extant research literature, I believe that we will find that there is a general uptick in perceived discrimination during COVID. In addition, we hypothesize that as discrimination experiences increase, so does poor mental health. We also hypothesize that social isolation will mediate the longitudinal relationship between perceived discrimination and perceive social isolation and perceived mental health. Lastly, we hypothesize a mediated-moderated model whereby those with perceived positive human connections who experience greater discrimination will report less social isolation and thus less poor mental health compared to those with perceived negative human connections who experience greater discrimination.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

Collaborators:

  • Catherine Xin - Graduate Trainee, New York University
  • zhilin Wang - Project Personnel, New York University
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