Jeremy Luk

National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH - NIAAA)

2 active projects

Mechanisms underlying LGBT disparities in subjective well-being during COVID-19

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) are at higher risk for mental health and substance use than individuals who identify as heterosexual. Few studies have extended these findings by testing potential downstream effects of LGBT disparities…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) are at higher risk for mental health and substance use than individuals who identify as heterosexual. Few studies have extended these findings by testing potential downstream effects of LGBT disparities on mental health and substance use to positive outcomes such as subjective well-being. Moreover, resilience and social support are critical protective factors, but their moderating roles are not well understood. The aims of this study are to: (1) examine LGBT disparities in mental health, substance use, and subjective well-being; (2) test COVID-related stress and LGBT-specific discrimination as potential mediators; and (3) understand the extent to which resilience and social support act as buffers against stress, discrimination, mental health, and substance use on subjective well-being. Secondary aims include the exploration of sex differences and sexual minority subgroup differences in the mediators and outcomes.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We plan to analyze data from the All of Us COPE Survey to examine whether individuals who identify as LGBT experience disparities in mental health, substance use, and subjective well-being, and test the hypothesized pathways within a structural equation modeling framework.

Anticipated Findings

(1) We hypothesize that individuals who identify as LGBT would be at higher risk for mental health and substance use behaviors, as well as lower subjective well-being than individuals who identify as heterosexual. (2) We anticipate that COVID-related stress and LGBT-specific discrimination would mediate the associations between LGBT status with mental health, substance use, and subjective well-being. (3) We expect that resilience and social support would moderate the hypothesized pathways. The findings from this study will add to the literature on LGBT health disparities as it uniquely focuses on stressors and discrimination experiences during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings will have the potential to inform prevention efforts on the population level during a public health crisis. Specific clinical implications include the development of targeted screening and interventions, as well as strategies to enhance resilience and social support in LGBT communities.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Jeremy Luk - Other, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH - NIAAA)

Mechanisms underlying LGBT disparities in subjective well-being during COVID-19

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) are at higher risk for mental health and substance use than individuals who identify as heterosexual. Few studies have extended these findings by testing potential downstream effects of LGBT disparities…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Individuals who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) are at higher risk for mental health and substance use than individuals who identify as heterosexual. Few studies have extended these findings by testing potential downstream effects of LGBT disparities on mental health and substance use to positive outcomes such as subjective well-being. Moreover, resilience and social support are critical protective factors, but their moderating roles are not well understood. The aims of this study are to: (1) examine LGBT disparities in mental health, substance use, and subjective well-being; (2) test COVID-related stress and LGBT-specific discrimination as potential mediators; and (3) understand the extent to which resilience and social support act as buffers against stress, discrimination, mental health, and substance use on subjective well-being. Secondary aims include the exploration of sex differences and sexual minority subgroup differences in the mediators and outcomes.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health
  • Social / Behavioral

Scientific Approaches

We plan to analyze data from the All of Us COPE Survey to examine whether individuals who identify as LGBT experience disparities in mental health, substance use, and subjective well-being, and test the hypothesized pathways within a structural equation modeling framework.

Anticipated Findings

(1) We hypothesize that individuals who identify as LGBT would be at higher risk for mental health and substance use behaviors, as well as lower subjective well-being than individuals who identify as heterosexual.
(2) We anticipate that COVID-related stress and LGBT-specific discrimination would mediate the associations between LGBT status with mental health, substance use, and subjective well-being.
(3) We expect that resilience and social support would moderate the hypothesized pathways.

The findings from this study will add to the literature on LGBT health disparities as it uniquely focuses on stressors and discrimination experiences during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. These findings will have the potential to inform prevention efforts on the population level during a public health crisis. Specific clinical implications include the development of targeted screening and interventions, as well as strategies to enhance resilience and social support in LGBT communities.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Jeremy Luk - Other, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH - NIAAA)

Collaborators:

  • Tommy Gunawan - Research Fellow, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIH - NIAAA)
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