Khanh Bui

Undergraduate Student, Regis University

3 active projects

Vietnamese immigrant health

We plan to study how moving to the U.S. affects the health of Vietnamese immigrants. We want to know how their life before coming to the U.S. (like their jobs, stress, or education) and their life after arriving (like learning…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

We plan to study how moving to the U.S. affects the health of Vietnamese immigrants. We want to know how their life before coming to the U.S. (like their jobs, stress, or education) and their life after arriving (like learning new ways, finding friends, and getting medical care) changes their health. This question is important because it helps us understand how moving from one country to another can make people healthier or not, and it can help doctors and the government do a better job of taking care of people who have moved to the U.S.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

To find answers, we're going to use two main ways of studying. First, we'll look at numbers and information from health surveys and medical records to see patterns of health among Vietnamese immigrants. We'll use computer programs to help us see these patterns clearly. Second, we'll talk to Vietnamese people who have moved to the U.S. to hear their stories. This way, we can understand their experiences better than just looking at numbers.

Anticipated Findings

From this study, we expect to learn a lot about how moving to the U.S. affects Vietnamese immigrants' health. We think we'll find out that having a good community and support helps people stay healthy. Our study will help everyone understand more about what new immigrants need to be healthy. This information can help make better health programs and policies to help immigrants. This study will add important information to what we already know about moving to a new country and health, which is good for everyone to understand.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Khanh Bui - Undergraduate Student, Regis University

Disparities in Immunotherapy

Unlike traditional treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, which target the cancer directly, immunotherapy works by stimulating or restoring the immune system's ability to detect and fight against malignancies. Immunotherapy is more targeted, less toxic, and often leads to significantly improved…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Unlike traditional treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, which target the cancer directly, immunotherapy works by stimulating or restoring the immune system's ability to detect and fight against malignancies. Immunotherapy is more targeted, less toxic, and often leads to significantly improved outcomes and reduced side effects among patients (Ahn et al., 2022). However, a critical issue patients in the United States are facing is the significant disparity in access to immunotherapy (Yao et al., 2022). Recent studies examining the efficacy and accessibility of immunotherapy found that Hispanic and Black patients were significantly less likely to receive immunotherapy compared to White patients (Haque et al., 2019). Patients with private insurance, higher income (≥$46,000), and treated at academic facilities are more likely to be administered immunotherapy compared to those with Medicaid, and individuals with lower incomes (Sahara et al., 2020).

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

Our study is the first to utilize a large and diverse dataset from the All of Us program to investigate how place of residence affects the accessibility and effectiveness of immunotherapy for cancer patients in the United States. Analyzing patient residences can highlight regions that are underrepresented in the dataset and in immunotherapy treatments and at risk of poor outcome due to geographical locations.

Anticipated Findings

There may be a significant disparity in access to immunotherapy between urban and rural residents. It's plausible that patients in urban areas, with easier access to immunotherapy and follow-up care, could exhibit lower relapse rates than those in rural areas.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Geography
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Controlled Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Khanh Bui - Undergraduate Student, Regis University

Disparity in Immunotherapy

Unlike traditional treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, which target the cancer directly, immunotherapy works by stimulating or restoring the immune system's ability to detect and fight against malignancies. Immunotherapy is more targeted, less toxic, and often leads to significantly improved…

Scientific Questions Being Studied

Unlike traditional treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, which target the cancer directly, immunotherapy works by stimulating or restoring the immune system's ability to detect and fight against malignancies. Immunotherapy is more targeted, less toxic, and often leads to significantly improved outcomes and reduced side effects among patients. However, a critical issue patients in the United States are facing is the significant disparity in access to immunotherapy. Recent studies examining the efficacy and accessibility of immunotherapy found that Hispanic and Black patients were significantly less likely to receive immunotherapy compared to White patients. Patients with private insurance, higher income and treated at academic facilities are more likely to be administered immunotherapy compared to those with Medicaid, and individuals with lower incomes.

Project Purpose(s)

  • Population Health

Scientific Approaches

We used the All of Us Controlled Tier Dataset version 7 for our study, focusing on patients receiving immunotherapy as a treatment for their cancer, including patients with Multiple Myeloma, Acute Lymphoid Leukemia (ALL), Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia (CLL), Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML), Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML), and Plasma Cell Leukemia. We categorized patients into 'urban' or 'rural' groups based on their zip codes from the dataset. We first looked at descriptive statistics, then we applied logistic regression analysis to examine the relationship between patients' place of residence (urban or rural) and relapses after controlling for sociodemographics. This method helped us determine if there was a statistically significant difference in relapse rates between urban and rural patients. This outcome helped us to evaluate the effectiveness of immunotherapy in the context of the patients' geographic locations.

Anticipated Findings

There may be a significant disparity in access to immunotherapy between urban and rural residents. It's plausible that patients in urban areas, with easier access to immunotherapy and follow-up care, could exhibit lower relapse rates than those in rural areas.

Demographic Categories of Interest

  • Race / Ethnicity
  • Age
  • Sex at Birth
  • Gender Identity
  • Sexual Orientation
  • Geography
  • Access to Care
  • Education Level
  • Income Level

Data Set Used

Registered Tier

Research Team

Owner:

  • Khanh Bui - Undergraduate Student, Regis University
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